Help with camera settings

Discussion in 'The Professional Gallery' started by hdukphotographs, Jun 11, 2007.

  1. hdukphotographs

    hdukphotographs TPF Noob!

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    I'm really new to portrait photography but my aunt wants me to take professional pics of her daughter going to a prom.I am really worried about making mistakes and was hoping someone could tell me the perfect settings for my camera (canon eos 350d)

    I will be taking indoor and outdoor shots
     
  2. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Welcome to the forum.

    There are no perfect settings. There is only the 'correct' settings to use in the light you are working with...and even then, correct is a pretty loose term.
     
  3. JIP

    JIP No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    I am not sure I understand you have a very amature camera and don't know how to set it how are you going to take "professional" pictures.
     
  4. hdukphotographs

    hdukphotographs TPF Noob!

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    I understand the basic of the camera its a new one but i was just looking for some tips to make my portrait shots better.I dont usually shoot people.
     
  5. Garbz

    Garbz No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    JIP I know a local profession who shoots on a D60 which is pretty much equivalent to the 350D :). The professional bit comes into do you have the support equipment. I.e. Fast lens for low-light. Studio lighting even. You can achieve very "professional" photos even on some very basic equipment.
     
  6. jemmy

    jemmy TPF Noob!

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    I am not sure I understand you have a very amature camera and don't know how to set it how are you going to take "professional" pictures....

    mmm... i beg to differ... i have some pretty nice shots taken from my 350d... sure i have a 5d now, but quality wise - i think the 350 takes a great photo.... or maybe it is the photographer not the camera???
     
  7. EOS_JD

    EOS_JD TPF Noob!

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    I too would agree that the above is not a good answer. i don't believe the 350D to be an "Amateur Camera". Sure many amatuers may own one but the skill in taking a photo is not in the camera but in the user.

    If you want "professional" pictures however, you need a professional photographer.

    Buy "Understanding Exposure" by bryan petersen and that will teach you a bit about your camera settings and what to look for. Read your camera manual. Practice a lot. And as you begin to understand exposure your images will improve.

    JD
     
  8. EOS_JD

    EOS_JD TPF Noob!

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    What lenses are you using?
     
  9. JIP

    JIP No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    This is really what I was trying to say.
     
  10. dgs

    dgs TPF Noob!

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    Duk,

    You have sinned! Now go sit in the corner. Ok, that's over with. I trust you've learned your lesson and will never take the P word in vain again.

    To obtain some pictures that will both put your best foot forward and please your subjects, practice a bit first. Indoors find indirect light from maybe a north window or light bounced off a pale wall. Look for shadows falling on faces to give a three dimensional effect without hard edges to the shadows. Difuse, indirect light will do this. Direct flash, particularly your Rebel onboard tube won't. Outdoors look for a way to block direct overhead light. Shelter houses at the park are wonderful places. If you can get your subjects under the shade of a roof while keeping the background bright and out of focus (depth of field) you may like what that gets you. This is a good place to gently use that onboard flash as fill . . . just don't let it look like a flash picture.

    Pay attention to your background. Outdoors you don't want trees, power poles or that pesky swingset growing out of your subject's head. Indoors you don't want corners of rooms, doors or picture frames on the wall competing with Buffy & Bif's soulful faces. Sounds silly, but you'd be amazed at how often they do. *grin*. A large aperture (small f number) will reduce the depth of field, throw the background out of focus and make your subjects stand out.

    These are Prom Pix? *grin* Cleavage is always good. *grin* Have some fun while you're shooting. Do your best to help your subjects have fun too. It shows. Another reason to practice first. Scratching your head and looking puzzled seldom reassures your subjects. So deal with puzzlement before the fact. Preparation goes a long way towards giving your subjects a reason to trust you and look good. btw, it's ok if they voluntarily use the P word . . . just don't repeat it yourself. . . upsets the natives.

    Try it, experiment (with a willing helper/model before the fact) Results that look good to you will look good to your friends.

    Have fun and good luck. Regard nothing I've said as gospel. I'm just an "amature" myself, albeit one with a spell checker.
     

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