Help with multiple film types

Discussion in 'Film Discussion and Q & A' started by Dylan, Oct 17, 2006.

  1. Dylan

    Dylan TPF Noob!

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    I have only been shooting with film for a while and 400 speed seems to work well however I'd like to try something different. I've heard a lot of people talking about 100 speed and slides etc. Which one is better for longer exposures? I'll be working with natural light and a tripod. I'm interested in landscape and macro photography </treehugger> lol. Does anyone have suggestions? Thanks
     
  2. Torus34

    Torus34 No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    With a non-moving subject and a tripod, film speed doesn't matter and the only criteria is grain or the lack of it. Lower ISO = less grainy negative/slide.

    You mentioned longer exposures. If they're really long, reciprocity failure may become important. Check it out.
     
  3. Digital Matt

    Digital Matt alter ego: Analog Matt

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    What he said. ^

    Fuji Provia 100F is a good film for long exposures. Reciprocity failure begins after 10 seconds I believe, I think you compensate by adding 1/3 to the exposure after that. Long exposures at night are a lot of guess work anyway.

    Slide film is highly recommend for landscape work.
     
  4. ladyphotog

    ladyphotog TPF Noob!

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    Reciprocity failure happens with exposures of 1 second or longer and differ from film to film. Look up the technical data sheet on whatever film you are using and it will give you the reciprocity failure for that film. It is very important for transparency films because that exposure needs to be right on.
     
  5. airgunr

    airgunr TPF Noob!

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    The vast majority of Landscape photographers like to use slow films like the Fuji Velvia 50 or the newer Velvia 100.

    When using slow films it is easier to creat those soft water effects by using a slow shutter speed. Waterfalls that look like cotton or soft etherial misty waves on a shoreline are achieved by using shutter speeds of 1/2sec to several seconds and slow films facilitate that.
     
  6. Dylan

    Dylan TPF Noob!

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    The velvia sounds like something I could use. I'll try it out. I priced it on Amazon and boy is it expensive. Do I need to have this developed at a special shop or can anyone do it?
     
  7. Digital Matt

    Digital Matt alter ego: Analog Matt

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    Slide film is developed with an E6 process, and is not readily available at your local 1 hour photo. I'd look for a pro lab near you.
     
  8. cosmonaut

    cosmonaut No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Remeber to that once the slide are back they will have to be scanned and printed. Most 1 hour labs don't do this either. If you are just learning I think I would just try some Fuji 100 film or 200 film from a department store. You won't get pro results but you will learn to shot the slower film.
     
  9. Dylan

    Dylan TPF Noob!

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    Hmmm that's a good point. I don't have the right kind of scanner for negatives. I guess it couldn't hurt to try with the regular 100 untill I get some practice. thanks for the advice.
     
  10. cosmonaut

    cosmonaut No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    I have had good luck with the Wal-Mart Fuji film. Sometimes it over saturates some but when you get your film developed tell them cd only. It will only cost $5.00 or less. Take your cd home and PhotoShop your scans. I am shooting e-6 right now but I do have an older scanner I got off of e-bay. You can get a fairly good scanner at office depot for $150.00 or so.
    Cosmo
    Also e-6 is very unforgiveing with exposure, it's easier to screw it up. Standard film exposure can be fixed, 2 to 3 stops by the lab and you never really know if you nailed exposure right.
     
  11. Digital Matt

    Digital Matt alter ego: Analog Matt

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    Since you have to find a pro lab to develop your E-6, they can certainly scan it for you as well. That's how they would make prints for you anyway. Everything is digital in commercial printing now.
     
  12. cosmonaut

    cosmonaut No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    This is true, but they charge anywhere from $2.00 and up per print. It can get pretty pricey. As far as developing I have found a lab that charges only $5.00 per 24 exposure roll...
    Cosmo
     

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