How can I improve color saturation?

Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by ismael, Dec 22, 2003.

  1. ismael

    ismael TPF Noob!

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    Hi,

    Other than using a high quality low speed film, are there other ways to improve color saturation? I heard some filters can help. If this is so, which ones? Any other suggestions?
    I miss the Ektar film :wink:

    Thanks,
    Ismael
     
  2. photoman

    photoman TPF Noob!

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    I know that you can overexpose print film about one stop to increase color saturation.

    The best filter i know of that will increase color saturation would be a polorizer, but with that filter you will lose two stops of light. :?

    I believe with other filters you could emphasise certain colors but for overall color satuation i would use a polorizer, and/ or overexpose print film. (opposite for slide film, i dont shoot slide film so i could be wrong)

    Your other option would be to use slide film, like fuji velveta or others. (much less forgiving than print film).

    Hope this helps :D
     
  3. voodoocat

    voodoocat ))<>(( Supporting Member

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    :lol: I'm picturing film made with velveta cheese

    Fuji Velvia is what you're thinking about.
     
  4. photoman

    photoman TPF Noob!

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    I told you i dont shoot slide film and i am a horrible speller :?

    I thought someone could get the idea, or something close to what i was thinking :lol:
     
  5. ksmattfish

    ksmattfish Now 100% DC - not as cool as I once was, but still

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    To increase color saturation over-expose print (neg) film by up to one stop or under-expose slide (positive) film 1/3 or 1/2 stop.

    Direct light, like the sun, increases color saturation. Unfortunately plants usually have a waxy coating to keep from drying out. This creates a lot of glare in the direct sun, so instead of getting the saturated color, you get some white glare which washed out the colors.

    A polarizing filter will significantly reduce glare in your photos leaving the saturated color. A polarizing filter must be adjusted for every shot; read the instructions that come with it.

    If you have an auto-focus camera be sure to get a circular polarizer. The other kind of polarizer is called linear, and only works when manually focusing.

    As mentioned, a pol filter does block two to three stops of light, use a tripod and cable release if your shutter speed drops to low. It's worth it!!!

    Many folks only use a polarizer on sunny days, but it works great on overcast days too. The effect is subtle looking through the lens, but in the photos it is very noticable (dull, blue green foliage turns to lush, bright green foliage).

    I shoot mostly BW, but if I'm shooting color landscapes or botanicals I ALWAYS use a polarizer.

    Fuji Velveeta does have it's own particularities, and using a polarizer with it will get you super saturated (possibly unnatural) colors, which you may find "cheesy".
     
  6. bogleric

    bogleric TPF Noob!

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    The worlds first edible negatives, how cool..... 8)
     
  7. terri

    terri Administrator Staff Member Supporting Member

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    mmmmm, can I have some wine with this film? :D
     
  8. tr0gd0o0r

    tr0gd0o0r TPF Noob!

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    I feel like a real moron asking this, but i've noticed that all cameras have different f-stops and aperture settings. I was wondering what exactly 1 stop is defined as. I assume that adjusting either aperture or shutter speed one "click" one be a stop, but some of my cameras have different settings so how does that work?
     
  9. photoman

    photoman TPF Noob!

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    I dont know exactly what these settings are?

    But one stop increase would be decreasing the light entering the camera by half (i.e. F 2.8 to F 4). (Much like increasing the shutter speed by one click will decrease the light by half)(i.e. 1/60th to 1/125th)

    These other settings may be inbetween settings, like 1/3 of a stop or 1/2 of a stop.

    Hope this helps
     
  10. ramjamband

    ramjamband TPF Noob!

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    Take a look at the following list copied from my new book I got for Christmas.

    Clear blue sky, Orange 85b
    Open shade summer sun, 81b
    Overcast sky, 81c
    Early AM or late PM, Blue 82c
    One hour before sunset, Blue 80c
    Sunset, Blue 80a

    Might try a few myself.
    Have fun.
    RJ.
     
  11. ksmattfish

    ksmattfish Now 100% DC - not as cool as I once was, but still

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    One stop is a halfing or doubling of the amount of exposure.

    Standard apertures in one stop increments are f/: 1, 1.4, 2, 2.8, 4, 5.6, 8, 11, 16, 22, 32, 45, 64, 90, 128, 180, 256....

    Manual focus SLRs usually had 1/2 stop clicks between these numbers on the aperture ring on the lens. Modern AF SLRs run everything on their fancy computer brains, eliminating the need for a standard, therefore you can see many "odd" f/stop numbers displayed in the viewfinder; they just do the math for each setting (focal length divided by aperture size in mm equals f/stop).

    Standard shutter speeds in one increments are 1 (1 second), 2 (1/2 second), 4 (1/4 second, etc...), 8, 15, 30, 60, 125, 250, 500, 1000, 2000, 4000, 8000, 16000....

    Old time shutters sometimes had different speeds, but most &lt;a href="http://get-certified.net?go=cameras" onmouseover="window.status = 'goto: cameras';return 1" onmouseout="window.status=''">cameras&lt;/a> built since the 60's had the above mentioned settings and maybe 1/2 or 1/3 stop clicks in between.
     

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