How do I...

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by desi_elegance, Jul 30, 2007.

  1. desi_elegance

    desi_elegance TPF Noob!

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    I was just looking through old posts and I came upon these pictures http://thephotoforum.com/forum/showthread.php?t=11600&highlight=panasonic fz20 I really like the picture of the flowers. I was wondering if anyone knows how to do that. Meaning how do I focus on one thing and blur the background? I have been trying to mess with it on my camera (Panasonic FZ20) but I just can't seem to figure it out.

    Please Help :)
     
  2. Garcia

    Garcia TPF Noob!

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    Should be a macro or supermacro mode on your camera.
     
  3. desi_elegance

    desi_elegance TPF Noob!

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    yeah I have a macro mode but does the camera need to be in auto or manual setting, or does it not matter? I have seen some pictures were you focus on a person and blur background scenary. How is that done. I know that macro is for close ups and stuff.
     
  4. Garcia

    Garcia TPF Noob!

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    I put it on Av mode and then turned on Macro and when real close to the object.
     
  5. maddermaxx

    maddermaxx TPF Noob!

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    Usually Bokeh (Blurry background focused subject) is from using a manual focus and a Wide aperture.
     
  6. DSLR noob

    DSLR noob TPF Noob!

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    It's hard to do on a point and shoot because the small sensor calls for a small actual focal length and small actual aperture. the aperture equivalents may be large, as the the focal length equivalents, but on a DSLR you need a wide open aperture or a far focal length, neither of which a point and shoot really has, they have a huge DOF.
     
  7. spyder

    spyder TPF Noob!

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    it happens naturally to some extent, but to maximize the effect make the aperature as wide as possible, have the subject as far away from the background as possible(and as close to you as possible) and zoom in as much as possible
     
  8. ChrisP

    ChrisP TPF Noob!

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    A great book for this is "Understanding Exposure" by Bryan Peterson. My understanding is that aperture is really key for taking advantage of depth of field.
     

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