How is lighting for indoor gyms and outdoor soccer fields? (night games)

Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by prodigy2k7, Jul 31, 2008.

  1. prodigy2k7

    prodigy2k7 No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    So, how is the lighting for indoor gym events like basketball and volley ball?
    Also, how is the lighting for outdoor soccer with decent stadium lights around the field? (College/Highschool; playing at elementary schools with decent setups)

    Using Canon EF 70-200mm F/2.8L IS USM what is a "idea" or "guess" on the shutter speed using F/2.8 and what ISO do you think I would have to use? (In gym and outdoors)

    Using Canon Rebel XTi with no flash...
     
  2. SpeedTrap

    SpeedTrap TPF Noob!

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    One thing to watch for will be the large sodium lights they use in arenas and stadiums, they flicker between RBG, so some of your shots will have a red, blue or green tint, they are very difficult to white balance, so be sure to be shooting in RAW.
    As for the ISO, you are going to have to check your histogram and exposure at each location.
     
  3. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Typically, those types of locations are a lot darker than we think. Human eyes adjust for it pretty easily but your camera's meter will show you that it's hard to get a decent shutter speed. Be prepared to use ISO 1600 if needed.
     
  4. prodigy2k7

    prodigy2k7 No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Dang, I was hoping to use ISO 800 max. I guess if I gotta use 1600 then I gotta. Well I guess for sports shots 1600 isn't as bad as using 1600 for a portrait.
     
  5. Joves

    Joves No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    A monopod would be a nice thing to have as well.
     
  6. Buszaj

    Buszaj TPF Noob!

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    I've shot several games in indoor gyms with the 70-200 f/4, non IS, at ISO 800. The shots were quite decent. I think that with the 2.8 IS you should manage at that ISO. Just run it through a noise removal program after. Oh ya, you might want to consider using your nifty fifty in the gym if you can get close enough.
     
  7. prodigy2k7

    prodigy2k7 No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    F/4 non IS? really? I never would have thought :p Ya I probably will use the 50mm too, i just dont really want to switch lenses..I wish I had another body :)

    Well having IS I wont be needing a monopod, but it could help :p I could combine them.
     
  8. Do'Urden's Eyes

    Do'Urden's Eyes TPF Noob!

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    that lens is fantastic. and depending on what youre shooting that will decide your ISO. so say if yoou want to catch some soccer action (movement) youre going to obviously need some quick shutter speeds and therefore probably a higher ISO. Now if you can think about it while shooting stationary players you can afford slower speeds and you can reduce the noise by lowering ISO. at slower speeds the IS should save you.

    good luck!
     
  9. gryphonslair99

    gryphonslair99 Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    I have shot lunar eclipses that provided more light than some of the gyms I have been in. Others, not so bad. I have shoot football, soccer, softball and baseball on fields that had pronounced bright areas and some with black holes that sucked the light away and I'm shooting college level. Every field and every indoor venue is different.

    For outdoor sports the 70-200 f2.8 is a good lens. It is always on a second body with the 400 f2.8 on my primary. For most field sports you want a shutter speed of 1/250th or faster. Adjust your ISO to suit the needs. If you are shooting in the evening, be sure to keep bumping up your ISO as the sun sets.

    Indoors, if you are shooting from the floor I would suggest something other than the 70-200 f2.8. Again you want to shoot for a minimum 1/250th shutter speed. My indoor glass consists of the 35 f1.4L, 85 f1.8, 100 f2.0, 135 f2.0L and the 200 f2.8L. I know you wondering why the 200 f2.8L and not the 70-200 f2.8L . The 200 f2.8 lets me shoot faster in terms of shutter speed than the 70-200 as it being a prime it's light gathering properties are different. Plus it is much sharper wide open than the zoom.

    If you are shooting from the stands and need the reach then the 70-200 a lot of times can still be usable you are just may have to push the ISO pretty high to get the shutter speed you need.

    One thing that has helped in shooting on the home court is being able to go out on the court ahead of time (like days ahead) and meter the whole court. That way I have an idea where the problem spots are. The home court is not bad as the lighting is plentiful and consistent. Some of the away courts however are really terrible and just plain require fast glass. Being able to get the ISO you need is going to be the deciding factor in keeping you shutter speeds up. I would rather have a noisy but sharp photo rather than one that is blurry with less noise. Good luck.
     
    Last edited: Aug 4, 2008
  10. gpimages

    gpimages TPF Noob!

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    There is no way to get decent action shots in a gym at f4 and ISO 800.
     
  11. Buszaj

    Buszaj TPF Noob!

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    Take a look for yourself. Now I know, its not the greatest, not very sharp and the arm's blurry, but for my needs (small shots in a yearbook) it is good. If they're being sold or put into a major newspaper, then obviously this shot won't do it. Thats beside the point though, the OPs 2.8 will suffice.

    [​IMG]
     

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