How is this done?

Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by grike, Sep 30, 2004.

  1. grike

    grike TPF Noob!

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    I'm new to Photography, and I own a Canon Powershot S500 Digital Camera, what are all of your opinions on this cam? Also, how do people get this color in their shots:

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    If you kind of get what I mean, they all have like a goldish tint to them.. I want to know how to get that color in my Photographs. Also, can someone reccomend me a good non-digital camera, I want to get into using film cameras. I've been into Photography a while but now I have a job and I can buy a camera and whatnot. Thanks for the help!
     
  2. Sharkbait

    Sharkbait TPF Noob!

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    The gold tint comes from shooting at night under those yellow arc-sodium lights. Your eyes automatically adjust to it pretty well so you don't notice it so much, but take a photo and it becomes quite apparent. Most of these are also longer exposures as well.
     
  3. jadin

    jadin The Mad Hatter

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    Shark is right on the type of lights. If you're shooting digital adjusting the white balance should allow you to pick up that color. For some reason I'm thinking setting your camera to 'incandescent' will bring that out the most.
     
  4. matthew robertson

    matthew robertson TPF Noob!

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    If it's anything like my S400, you have an excellent camera. Occasionally we'll have a disagreement about which photo we'd like to take (the camera and I), but by turning off all of the "smart" features, I usually win. It's not the same as having full manual controls, but it does take excellent pictures. My only addition has been a soft hacky-sack to hold in my left hand -- it helps to stabilize the small camera when hand-held. (Oh, and an underwater case, too.)

    I'm told that film cameras have a number of specific advantages over digital: but since I'm not into that particular anachronism, someone else will need to help you here.

    My only suggestion is that you take the number of photos you expose (NOT just keep) with your digital camera, determine the cost per exposure for a film camera, calculate your average daily film costs, and then multiply that by the lifetime of your prospective purchase.
     

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