Hoya Filters

Discussion in 'Photography Equipment & Products' started by rmh159, Jul 24, 2006.

  1. rmh159

    rmh159 TPF Noob!

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    I might be making a trip to the beach soon and figured it was the perfect excuse to get a filter or two for my D50. Hoya seems to be the more popular company to go to for filters but wanted to throw out the idea and see if anyone else had suggestions.

    I was originally going to go with a polarizer but due to the beach trip and another trip that might be coming up (involving water fountains) I'm thinking a neutral density might work better. Any suggestions for that? I was think a an 8 would be a good start but wasn't sure if I should get a graduated filter or not.

    I also some are multi-coated and others aren't. Any info on that would be appreciated as well.

    Thanks!
     
  2. Tiberius

    Tiberius TPF Noob!

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    Especially in a beach environment, I'd make sure you threw on some kind of filter - perhaps just a basic UV or Skylight one - for protection from sand, water, etc. As far as for beach shots in particular, I've had some good results with using circular polarizers, but haven't tried ND filters to know if they work any better.
     
  3. Digital Matt

    Digital Matt alter ego: Analog Matt

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    Work better for what? A neutral density filter and a polarizer do not do the same thing. A polarizer will darken your scene yes, but not always uniformly. That's not what it's meant for. What effect are you trying to get?
     
  4. rmh159

    rmh159 TPF Noob!

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    Sorry... I wasn't too clear. For the beach and fountains I'd want to use the ND to blur the water. I know a polarizer can have a similar affect but a ND should be a little more dependable for that specific affect (though I could be wrong).

    For the most part I'm pretty clear on the differences between the ND and Polarizer... I think where I could use the most help is on which brand to get... what the multi-coated means... and what level of ND would be a good start. I tend to prefer more dramatic affects and contrast in pictures if that makes a difference.

    I've also looked on the web and haven't seen a good resource for info on filters. Most sites just describe what they do but I'd like to see pictures of examples. If anyone has ideas... I'm all ears.

     
  5. Torus34

    Torus34 No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    I've found Hoyas to be satisfactory.
     
  6. ksmattfish

    ksmattfish Now 100% DC - not as cool as I once was, but still

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    Hoya makes good filters.

    Lens coatings reduce flare, and may increase contrast. A long time ago lenses were coated with a single coating (before that they weren't coated at all, how did they even take pictures!?!). Now days they all have multiple combinations of top-secret, space age, rare-earth elements, and voodoo-witchcraft optimized to work with film or digital, and guaranteed to take only masterpieces! Just kidding. I'm not saying that fancy multi-coatings are worthless, but in most cases the saleperson will see a bigger difference ($90 instead of $30) than the purchaser.

    Neutral density filter only block light. They don't add contrast, or drama, or anything. They just block light. I would assess your reasons for needing to block light, and then you can decide how strong of a ND filter you need.

    Polarizers, if used correctly, reduce reflections (which tends to make colors look more saturated), darkens cyan skies into blue, and block about 2 to 2.5 stops of light.
     

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