I have a budget and......

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by Chaba, Jun 18, 2007.

  1. Chaba

    Chaba TPF Noob!

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    I am thinking of buying a camera and I have about $900 canadian put aside. I plan on taking outdoor photos of scenery and landmarks and maybe making a portfolio which will eventualy get me into a career in some form of creative photography. What is the best camera I could get?

    Thankyou in advance.
     
  2. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Welcome to the forum.

    Does it have to be digital? Would you consider used?

    Either way, if you are considering this as something that could lead to a career...I would certainly suggest a Digital SLR camera. The entry level models would include the Canon Rebel XTi, the Nikon D40, the Pentax K100D, the Sony Alpha etc.

    As for the best camera you could get...that depends. I'd say that a used Canon 20D & lens would fit into that budget. Late last year, I bought a 20D with 17-85 lens on E-bay for $1000.

    With the Canadian dollar currently being very close to the value of the American dollar...I would suggest looking to buy from a good camera store in the US. Even with shipping costs, prices are usually quite higher in Canadian camera stores. I suggest B&H or Adorama (see links at top of page). Don't chase the lowest price on the internet...it won't lead to anything good.
     
  3. Chaba

    Chaba TPF Noob!

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    Thanks for that :hail: (even though I took so long to reply). It doesnt have to be digital, in fact I heard digital doesnt give the clearest picture possible, dont know if thats true or not. Im going to the states (buffalo) soon enough si ill check it out. Thanks again.
     
  4. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

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    It's still pretty much up in the air...some people will tell you that digital hasn't caught up to film...on the other hand, I'd guess that the vast majority of working pro photographers are now using digital...so if it's good enough for them...it's got to be good.

    If you are considering film vs digital...you need to look at your needs and your workflow. A film camera is much cheaper, but then you need to buy film develope your photos. You have to carry the film with you and change the roll after 12, 24 or 36 shots. If you want to digital edit or display your shots, you would need to scan them or have them scanned.

    With digital, the camera is much more expensive but the digital workflow is much faster and some would say easier. Memory cards can hold hundreds of shots. Feed back in practically instantaneous...which can make learning much easier.
     
  5. JIP

    JIP No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    I would have to say if you are considering a photography related career unless it is in fine arts and you are using some kind of alternative processes digital is the way to go. I would say probably 80% of editorial type photography is digital, most portraits are done digital. I could go on and on but you get the point I would not trade my foundation if film for the worl but if you are just starting out and have a limited budget go digital.
     
  6. jstuedle

    jstuedle No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    I have mentioned this before, but here goes.... I changed over to digital totally a while back. State of the art was 2 1/2 MP for a DSLR. My foundation was in film obviously. I taught my grandson on film a couple of years ago when he was 11. I am a firm believer that to get that solid foundation in photography, one should start out with a totally manual camera, a hand held meter and a B&W darkroom. Learn to shoot with this rig and your eye will see things you would otherwise miss. Using the hand held meter will burn in the "Sunny 16 rule". You can eventually learn to shoot without a meter. When your full auto rig tells you to shoot a snow shot about 4 stops over, the red flag will alert you. Film will teach you to take time with your shots, think them through. Your mind will absorb more as you take your time and setup your shots more deliberately. This is not to say a P&S digital can't go along for the fun of it. But I really believe to learn correctly and have what you learn burned into all available brain cells, film is the way to go. JMHO
     
  7. cigrainger

    cigrainger TPF Noob!

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    For what you want to do, look into a large format camera. The most common size is 4"x5" film. You will be able to alter the perspective using the available movements of the camera in a way that is impossible with 35mm or medium format. The negatives will be huge and clear, allowing big enlargements. This is the best camera you can buy for what you want to do. Ansel Adams used large format. Aside from using a tilt shift lens, no 35mm or medium format can offer the perspective correction of a large format camera, and even that is not equal.
     
  8. cigrainger

    cigrainger TPF Noob!

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    Oh and check out KEH.com
     

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