ISO

Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by justforfun52, Jul 9, 2005.

  1. justforfun52

    justforfun52 TPF Noob!

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    My mom, knowing that I am short on cash right now (University sucks), just bought me 8 rolls of Kodak MAX ISO 800 film. Though her intentions are good, I don't usually use or need that speed of film. When using this film would manually changing the ISO on my camera to 100 or 200 ISO give me the same effect as using actual 100 or 200 ISO film? If so, does it mean I still have to deal with the quality issues of ISO 800 film (ie. grain size, colour, etc.)? Thanks for the newb help!
     
  2. justforfun52

    justforfun52 TPF Noob!

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  3. thebeginning

    thebeginning TPF Noob!

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    no matter what you set on your camera, you will still have 800 speed film with 800 speed film grain.
     
  4. justforfun52

    justforfun52 TPF Noob!

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    Alright. I figured as much about the grain. So if I use the 800 and set my camera to 100, the results will look the same if I left it at the 800 default?. Why does the camera allow you to change the film speed when it knows the speed of the film you are using in the camera? Is it because there is film that doesn't provide this info to the camera?
     
  5. wharrison

    wharrison TPF Noob!

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    Justforfun52:

    Thank your mother and then kindly request that she purchase a few rolls of a lower ASA/ISO film. In the meantime, place the rolls of the 800 ISO film in the freezer and make use of them when needed.

    An easy way to solve a problem.

    Bill
     
  6. ksmattfish

    ksmattfish Now 100% DC - not as cool as I once was, but still

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    Changing the ISO on the camera only affects the meter. When you change it you are overriding the auto DX coding (black and chrome bar code thing on film cassettes). If you set the camera to ISO 100, the meter will give you the exposure neccessary for ISO 100, and ignore the DX code for ISO 800.

    Once upon a time there was no DX coding, so you always had to set the ISO. Now days you might be shooting a roll of IR film, which usually doesn't have DX coding, or bulk loaded cassettes, again often without DX coding (although you can get them with the code). Or maybe you've done personal film speed testing and determined that you get better results exposing the film more or less than what the manufacturer recommends.

    If you shoot ISO 800 film at what the meter tells you to shoot ISO 100 film it will be 3 stops overexposed, and would probably look worse than if it was shot at 800. You can probably get away with shooting it at ISO 400. To be honest, my personal opinion of Kodak Gold 800 is that it's possibly the ugliest film ever made. On the other hand, I've always really liked Kodak Gold 200.
     
  7. mentos_007

    mentos_007 The Freshmaker!

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    you cannot just ignore the setting of your cammera. when you wll set it on 100 and the film is 800 the auto exposure mode will be affected by what you set and give fake results.
     
  8. Artemis

    Artemis Just Punked Himself

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    You can normally "Push" the film up, as in have film at ISO 400, but set the camera to 800, and you will get more grain.
    My advice would be use it, theres no point not experimenting with different film, and you can learn a lot about your camera, like you are now simply by using different film.
    800 isnt that grainy...its normally ok....its when you go into the 1000's that you have to start worrying.
    Get some friends, get a flash gun, and get them to do some skating at night...youll love it then! :D
     
  9. Jeff Canes

    Jeff Canes No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    In the passed I used a lot of 800iso for baseball pics, my experience was that with good to bright natural day light 800iso is fine for 8x10 prints, and that was with both Kodak and Fuji, but with gray sky the out come was a lot of grin
     
  10. tr0gd0o0r

    tr0gd0o0r TPF Noob!

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    If you do choose to override your meter iwth the 800 film, which i've never really herad of anyone doing, just remember that its going to be 3 stops over exposed, and that when your film gets developed whoever is processing it needs to pull (process with the exposure in mind) the film to accomodate it.
     
  11. airgunr

    airgunr TPF Noob!

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    As trOgDOoOr indicated,

    you could "Pull" process the film at a lower speed. While it is possible to "Pull" it 3 stops to ISO100 you still wouldn't get good results. I believe you can "PULL" it at least one stop but over that and the picture sufferes. The other factor in "PULL" processing it you pay extra for each stop you ask for.

    I would go with the idea of Freezing it for future use or at best see if your mom and exchange it where she got it.
     
  12. arishia

    arishia TPF Noob!

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    What exactly does ISO stand for? What kind of film should I use with a manual SLR as a begginner, seeing that I am still learning the basic concepts of photography and camaras? Thanks for the help!
     

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