Just bought a Canonet GIII QL-17!

Discussion in 'Film Discussion and Q & A' started by Gregoryniss, May 14, 2009.

  1. Gregoryniss

    Gregoryniss TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Feb 15, 2009
    Messages:
    55
    Likes Received:
    0
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    Just won one of these off of Ebay :mrgreen:. This will be my first rangefinder camera so i'm looking for some basic tips on how to use one. Anything helps, I think im going to pick up a wein cell px625 battery (any feedback on these things? how long do they last?). Just wanted to share some excitement and possibly some tips on how to get good results!
     
  2. bhop

    bhop No longer a newbie, moving up!

    Joined:
    Dec 10, 2007
    Messages:
    2,209
    Likes Received:
    236
    Location:
    Los Angeles
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    Congrats. I have 2 user Canonets and a third parts camera. I love using them. It was my first rangefinder too and now i'm saving for an M-mount camera cuz i'm hooked on rangefinders! I actually probably use the Canonets more than any of my other cameras. The small size is nice so i'm able to take it wherever I go easily, and although i'm not a fan of shutter priority (the only way the meter works on these cameras) I got used to it, and it is capable of nice sharp photos. The 40mm f/1.7 lens is fantastic and just the right focal length for my style of shooting. Not too wide, not too long.

    As far as tips, make sure you set the aperture ring to A, as I mentioned, only way the meter works, although, you can still shoot meterless with no battery. Battery life? It's hard to say, but I "think" my weins last for at least 6 months if not longer. Not as long as "normal" batteries, but it's only 5 bucks for one, not too bad. Make sure you check your light seals when you get it, and make sure the aperture blades open and close smoothly when you turn the ring. Other than that, just have fun with it.
     
  3. usayit

    usayit No longer a newbie, moving up!

    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2003
    Messages:
    9,523
    Likes Received:
    344
    Location:
    North New Jersey, United States of America
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    Congrats... I have 5 on my shelf (in various states of operation.. bummer). heheh lol. If you find the Canonlite D flash that goes with it, buy it. They are hard to find in working condition and design specifically with the camera as a system (don't use it on other cameras especially DSLRs... high trigger voltage). Lovely camera and a blast to use. It was made popular in part of the clean look it had and easy operation. It was also featured in the 90s movie "Pecker" which also boosted its popularity.

    One of five was in mint condition until the magneto (I think?) went... I definitely want to get it fixed someday.

    As for tips... bhop pretty much covered it... it is an easy camera to learn. If you have a battery in it, make sure you take it OFF of "A" when storing. This is to make sure you are not draining the battery. The original mercury px625 is no longer available (banned). You can find alkaline versions of the battery: www.photobattery.com

    Light seals in these cameras also tend to get sticky over time. 100% of all Canonets I have ever seen needed to have these replaced. They are easy to DIY. You just have to find foam sheets somewhere which can be difficult to find. My source is out of business (used to be cameraseals.com). I found a couple sales on ebay... Please post if you find another source.
     
    Last edited: May 15, 2009
  4. usayit

    usayit No longer a newbie, moving up!

    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2003
    Messages:
    9,523
    Likes Received:
    344
    Location:
    North New Jersey, United States of America
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    btw.. bhop... M-mount eh... :thumbup:

    Considered high bang-for-the-buck Cosina/Voigtlander and/or the wonderfully featured Konica Hexar RF?
     
  5. Torus34

    Torus34 No longer a newbie, moving up!

    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2006
    Messages:
    2,117
    Likes Received:
    37
    Location:
    Tottenville, Staten Island, NYC USA
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    For anyone looking for this general type of camera, the Yashica G series rigs are readily available at great prices. A bit of fiddling with a home-made spring to adapt present batteries [same voltage] to fit and you're up and running. The GSN model even has parallax correction -- something of a boon for those new to rangefinders. The lens is excellent, too.
     
  6. Dwig

    Dwig TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Mar 11, 2009
    Messages:
    1,261
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Key West FL
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    The Canon QL-17 G-III and the unmarked G-II also have parallax correction and have a distinctly superior lens. They also have completely mechanical shutters that function without the battery.

    BTW, the second generation QL-17 is almost identical to the 3rd generation "G-III" model. The largest external difference is that the G-III has a safety switch built into a cover over the PC terminal that disables the hot shoe when a cord is connected. This prevents the hot shoe from being connected to the flash's trigger circuit. Trigger circuits were rather high voltage (300+ volts) in those days an brushing your nose across a live hot shoe is more than just uncomfortable.

    Another note on this class of meter. Battery drain is directly proportional to the amount of light that strikes the meter cell. If you keep a lens cap on it effectively turns the power off. The battery drain is reduced to such a low level that battery life is not significantly different that when the power is actually turned off with a switch. Still, it is very very highly recommended that you never store these cameras for any length of time with a battery installed. If the battery leaks or expands it can damage the camera.
     
    Last edited: May 15, 2009
  7. Sjixxxy

    Sjixxxy TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Apr 14, 2009
    Messages:
    109
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    MN
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    Make sure to check it for fungus. I got one off eBay once that had a nice layer of it etched across the lens. Images from that one were quite underwhelming.
     
  8. Sjixxxy

    Sjixxxy TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Apr 14, 2009
    Messages:
    109
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    MN
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    I got my light baffle material from Micro-Tools. One of their sheets is enought to fix a lot of cameras. I bought some in 2003 and still have about 85% of it left. Comes inhandy though. I've used it to repair light leaks on a bunch of various old camera's that I own.
     
  9. Gregoryniss

    Gregoryniss TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Feb 15, 2009
    Messages:
    55
    Likes Received:
    0
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    [​IMG]
    I assume this is going to need the foam replaced? This is the one I won on ebay. I just ordered an "inter-slice" kit off of ebay for $10. seems to have good feedback. Any tips on how to get the original stuff off?


    Also, is it possible to take the lens off the camera? can you take off just the front element (if there is fungus)? Thanks a bunch for all the help
     
  10. usayit

    usayit No longer a newbie, moving up!

    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2003
    Messages:
    9,523
    Likes Received:
    344
    Location:
    North New Jersey, United States of America
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    Thanks for the pointer. Time to restock.
     
  11. usayit

    usayit No longer a newbie, moving up!

    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2003
    Messages:
    9,523
    Likes Received:
    344
    Location:
    North New Jersey, United States of America
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    I used ol'fashion "elbow grease" and some bamboo skewers that were cut into whatever point I needed... I used them kinda like a chisel to scrap the goo off. Once you see the camera film door, you'll know what needs to be done. Pretty straight forward. Just don't use too thick of a foam or else the latch will not hold.

    I wouldn't recommend it.... unless you know how to realign the elements with the film plane.
     
  12. Sjixxxy

    Sjixxxy TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Apr 14, 2009
    Messages:
    109
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    MN
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    Scrape the big chunks off with whatever. I think I finished up with some rubbing alcohol and a q-tip to remove whatever goo was left.
     

Share This Page

Search tags for this page
canon g iii ql removing lens
,

canon ql19 lens removal

,
canonet ql 17 giii
,

canonet ql17 lens removal

,
canonet ql17 lr44
,
canonet ql25 issues
,
how do you change lenses canon coronet ql17
,
how to take off the lens on a canonet ql19
,
off shoe camera cord canon ql17
,
removing lens from canon g-iii ql