Lighting technique of Mark Segal, Yu Tsai, Jean-Baptiste Mondino

Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by agerone, Aug 11, 2010.

  1. agerone

    agerone TPF Noob!

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    Hey everybody!
    I'm back with a new huge question. I'm always wondering what light/flashes professional fashion photographers use and how they position it. Of course I know that there has to be some or a lot of post production in photoshop but I'm sure that the original pictures are already well lightened etc.
    I have here some examples by three well known fashion photographers that achieve the look and lighting of the photo I'm interested in.
    It would be really great if you could tell me something about the detailed process of such a shooting and especially, if you can guess by looking at the pictures, what lighting setup they are using for each photo series here.
    Sketches or photos similar setups would be cool, too, if available. If you also know more on the post production of those photos, I would be happy if you could let me know what techniques are used there basically.

    Click on the images for larger view.

    1. Mark Segal: Adidas SLVR FW09 shooting.
    http://www.tenerclase.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/07/slvr.jpg
    http://www.tenerclase.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/07/slvr2.jpg
    http://www.tenerclase.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/07/slvr3.jpg
    http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_uEQ4rM0y3...10_DouglasNeitzke_phMarkSegal_22_122_86lo.jpg
    http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_uEQ4rM0y3...W10_DouglasNeitzke_phMarkSegal_20_122_8lo.jpg
    http://img220.imagevenue.com/aAfkjf...0_DouglasNeitzke_phMarkSegal_13_122_425lo.jpg
    http://www.imagebam.com/image/affd0d42656829
    http://www.imagebam.com/image/a0c0ce42657053
    http://www.imagebam.com/image/d5511142656832
    The thing I noticed on those photos is that you can still see the "texture" of the models' skin like on the 5th photo. I like that and it shows me that no huge post production has been made in photoshop. So it's just all up to the light in the studio.
    ------------------------------------------

    2. Yu Tsai: Katy Perry Esquire shooting.
    I found a behind the scenes video in which you can often see that they are using a light from the top right with a (broncolor?) softbox, what flash is that exactly? I don't see that he is using more than one light for a photo, is that true? what do you think? VIDEO: Esquire Katy Perry by Yu Tsai on Vimeo

    http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_cyH_7sPxVcQ/TDOMd0plI7I/AAAAAAAADNY/ujkaxvdNfHE/s1600/Katy+Perry+picture+in+2010+Esquire+Photoshoot+by+Yu+Tsai+%282%29.jpg
    http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_cyH_7sPxV...in 2010 Esquire Photoshoot by Yu Tsai (3).jpg
    http://cache.gawkerassets.com/asset...1277488176491_katy-perry-esquire-boobs-01.jpg
    ------------------------------------------

    3. Jean-Baptiste Mondino
    http://mondino-update.net/img/img2/044.jpg
    http://mondino-update.net/img/img2/045.jpg
    ------------------------------------------

    Also, if you know more about the make up that maybe has to be used, please tell me. I don't know much about basic make up techniques that should be applied on the model at least for the shots above.

    Thank you very much in advance! I hope I don't ask too much...
    Greetings, agerone
     
    Last edited: Aug 11, 2010
  2. Alpha

    Alpha Troll Extraordinaire

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    In the pictures you posted, Segal clearly has a large key light at camera right and a fill at camera left. There doesn't appear to be much rim light unless it's bounced off the background.

    The Yu-Tsai shots could be just about anything in terms of modifiers. The only thing you can tell for sure is that the key light is directly in front of the model. This could be anything from gridded strip-boxes to beauty dishes.

    Mondino is anyone's guess. It's even light. There are many ways to do that.

    As for makeup, no makeup HAS to be used. Unless you're interested in investing in a makeup kit, I would search out MUA's to work with. Start by doing TF* work or paying a little bit.
     
  3. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Learning to deconstruct lighting is certainly a good skill to work on...especially if have an idea of what you want to do.

    The main things to look at, are the shadows and where/how they transition into areas that are lit. For example, Segal's photos were shot with a soft light source to camera right...which is evident by the somewhat gradual transitions to shadows on the left side. Also, you can tell by the shadows on the floor wall, that it's a large/soft light source.
    He's also using a rather high ratio (the difference between the lit side and the shadows). I'd guess maybe an 8:1. This helps give the images a dramatic feel.

    Yu-Tsai is also using a soft light source, but the ratio doesn't appear to be as deep/strong, as the shadows aren't as deep.

    The last set has a light higher above the model, which you can tell from the shadow under the chin or arm.
     
  4. agerone

    agerone TPF Noob!

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    Thanks Alpha and Mike.
    I first had to look up what lighting ratio means but know understand better how you described the basic setup, mike. I think you're right with the 8:1 ratio guess.

    If someone has another guess or if you find some setup pictures or illustrations for such photos I would be happy. I already have done a lot of research before posting my question and I wasn't able to find any good piece of information on the internet.
    If you also know what flashes or softboxes, beauty dishes etc. they're using exactly, please let me know.
    thanks
     
  5. Scatterbrained

    Scatterbrained Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    Does it matter exactly what modifiers they are using? ;)
     
  6. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

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    You might also want to read up on some of the 'standard' lighting patterns. For example, in the first set, the first, 3rd & 4th photos appear to be a 'Loop' lighting pattern. The last two are 'Rembrandt'.

    And yes, it doesn't really matter what specific brand/type of lighting they are using. That is mostly irrelevant. A good photographer should be able to create similar results with many different brands/types etc. There are, of course, subtle difference between things like softboxes, umbrellas etc...but I think that is a discussion for another day.
     
  7. agerone

    agerone TPF Noob!

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    >Scatterbrained: I'm sorry, I don't know what you mean by "modifiers". (By the way I'm German and there is a lot of vocabulary that I don't know of course :) )
    But if you're talking about the gear then, no it doesn't matter exactly which brand they're sold from. I want just to know if it's a softbox, beauty dish, para or else and which size, the distance and angle to the model etc etc. :)
     
  8. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Yes, by 'modifiers', they are talking about softboxes, umbrellas, grids, snoots, dish etc.

    This is a harder thing to judge by looking at the image. Especially if you can't get in close enough to find some catch lights (reflections) in the eyes etc.

    HERE is a site that allows you to compare the results from different light modifiers or 'shapers'.
     
  9. agerone

    agerone TPF Noob!

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    Thank you very much for the link, mike! It really helps me a lot!

    In the making of video you can mainly see only one light. Could someone tell me how this little para/or softbox is called? can't find it anywhere.
    But in the making of video there is also sort of a big reflector or big para behind the photographer sometimes but I don't really know what and why? Also there is a nonreflective black board between photog and this thing...
    So am I assuming right if I say that for the Yu Tsai photoshoot there was only used one light? Never thought that you can get such a good lighting with only one (small) light. It is really a vivid lighting and that's why I am a bit unsure about this.
     
    Last edited: Aug 11, 2010
  10. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

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    While you certainly can do amazing things with only one light, it looks like maybe they are using two. Some photographers light to put their 'fill' light back as far as possible, so that might be what appears to be behind him.

    The main purpose of a 'fill' light, is to control the depth of the shadows. Many teachers will tell you that it can (or should) be placed on the camera axis, thus providing an even amount of light over the whole scene. It adds light to both the shadows and the bright side of the model.

    The main or 'key' light is then used to define the lit areas and the shadow areas. The strength (power & distance) of each light, will determine the ratio between the two.
     
  11. Mike_E

    Mike_E No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Sorry if I sound a jerk here but you have heard of copyright infringement, haven't you?

    Unless you have permission to post/own these photos, in which case you have my apology.
     
  12. agerone

    agerone TPF Noob!

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    Mike E> I'm sorry, fixed it a bit, tell me if I'm still doing wrong.

    Big Mike> Thanks for the explanation! Do you know how this little para or softbox is called what they are using mainly?

    Edit: Okay, the little parareflector that was used often for this yu-tsai shoot was is something like this Briese Focus 44 (http://www.solalights.com/system/files/64/main/Focus44F-listing.jpg)
    In the video it has maybe around 1,5 to 2 metres distance from the model. So would there be a difference if I used a parareflector with a bigger diameter but nearer to the model?
     
    Last edited: Aug 11, 2010

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