macro/step-up filter question

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by haris, Feb 5, 2008.

  1. haris

    haris TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Sep 14, 2007
    Messages:
    52
    Likes Received:
    0
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    i love macro but not enough $$$ to own macro lens :( i heard that we can use macro/close-up filter to get same macro effect as a real macro lens. maybe not the exactly the same but that it's a cheaper way of achieving the macro photos. can anyone tell me whether this would be a good idea? will it change the minimum focus distance of the lens, DOF, f-stop etc?
     
  2. Helen B

    Helen B TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2007
    Messages:
    3,296
    Likes Received:
    465
    Location:
    Hell's Kitchen, New York
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    A close-up lens (diopter) reduces the effective focal length of the lens it is attached to. Because of that it decreases both the minimum focus distance and the maximum focus distance. When the main lens (also called the prime lens, 'prime lens' having two different meanings) is set to focus at infinity, the combination will be focused at the focal length of the close-up lens. For example, a 3 diopter close-up lens has a focal length of 1/3 metres, so when the main lens is set at infinity, the combination will be focussed at 1/3 metre.

    The reduction in focal length does mean that working distances are reduced when compared to extension tubes with the same main/prime lens at the same magnification.

    If you take a 50 mm prime lens and a 3 diopter close-up lens, the combination will behave like a 43 mm lens. A 50 mm lens is a 1000/50 = 20 diopter lens, so the combination is 23 diopters, or 1/23 metres, or 43 mm.

    There is usually no need to make an adjustment to the f-number.

    Close-up filters are of varying quality. There are simple single-element lenses and double or triple element achromats (ie they have some correction for chromatic abberation). Leica, Nikon and Canon, among others, make achromats. Nikon and canon also make single element lenses. Within Nikon's range, the 'T' designation usually means that it is the higher quality version, eg the 4T.

    Best,
    Helen
     
  3. gryphonslair99

    gryphonslair99 Been spending a lot of time on here!

    Joined:
    Sep 9, 2006
    Messages:
    11,441
    Likes Received:
    2,100
    Location:
    Wichita, Kansas, USA
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    Try extension tubes.

    http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/375238-REG/Kenko_AEXTUBEDGN_Auto_Extension_Tube_Set.html

    Or for less money a reversing ring.
    http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/37172-REG/Nikon_2629_BR_3_Mount_Adapter_Ring.html
     
  4. logan9967

    logan9967 TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2008
    Messages:
    611
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    i recommend an extension tube, i love my 28-75mm tamron for it personally, mostly because i don't ever have enough light to use my larger lenses
     
  5. airgunr

    airgunr TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2004
    Messages:
    846
    Likes Received:
    4
    Location:
    Delavan, Wisconsin, USA
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    I would also suggest looking into getting a set of extension tubes. I think you will get much bettter results.
     
  6. haris

    haris TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Sep 14, 2007
    Messages:
    52
    Likes Received:
    0
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    whats the difference between image produced by extension tube, close-up filter and true macro lens?
     
  7. gryphonslair99

    gryphonslair99 Been spending a lot of time on here!

    Joined:
    Sep 9, 2006
    Messages:
    11,441
    Likes Received:
    2,100
    Location:
    Wichita, Kansas, USA
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    Close-up filters are just a piece of glass or plastic depending on what it is made of that goes on the end of your lens. It is designed to magnify the object you are trying to photograph, like a magnifying glass will A $10 or $15 close up filter is not going to be of high quality and will not usually produce high quality results. It is truly one of those you get what you pay for things. Good ones can be quite expensive and have only one purpose.

    Extension tubes are just that. Hollow tubes. They have no optics in them at all. Good ones have electrical contacts that allow for all the auto functions of a modern auto focus lens. They provide macro capabilities by shortening the minimum focus distance allowing you to get closer and still focus. They are an excellent start for someone to get into macro. A decent lens will provide the same image quality with tubes attached as with out the tubes. You can use a wide variety of lenses as well. As with everything good tubes will cost more than the cheap=o's but good tubes are reasonably priced and have full automatic capabilibies.

    A true macro lens provides at least 1:1 magnification. They are often, but not always, prime lenses. They are built to allow for very short focusing distances. They can also be used as prime lenses of what ever focal length you choose. They can be a bit pricey, but then they serve a dual purpose as both a macro lens and a prime lens. My Canon 100mm macro is a wonderful macro lens, that also produces very crisp, sharp macro shots. It is also a wonderful portrait lens providing very sharp, crisp portraits as well. They can be the best of both worlds, but at a higher cost than tubes.


    One thing I forgot to mention, If you really get into macro photography and you buy a dedicated macro lens, you can still use the tubes to get you even closer than 1:1.
     

Share This Page

Search tags for this page

close up filter with step up filter

,

macro step up

,

step down filter for macro

,

step up filter for macro

,

step up filters for macro

,

step up gfilter macro

,

stepping down effect on macro photography