negs and slides using a film scanner

Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by ajmall, Jun 16, 2004.

  1. ajmall

    ajmall TPF Noob!

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    i don't have a film scanner so i don't know but may well be getting one soon. is the quality the only difference in comparison when scanning a slide vs negative?
     
  2. ksmattfish

    ksmattfish Now 100% DC - not as cool as I once was, but still

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    There shouldn't be any significant quality difference between properly exposed, similar speed films neg or pos. Just that one scan is a positive, and the other is a negative that will have to be converted to positive to be viewed. This can be tricky, particularly if the film has a colored base, such as the orange base of most color neg film.
     
  3. ajmall

    ajmall TPF Noob!

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    ok thanks, thats made me feel better about getting a scanner...
     
  4. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Maybe the quality difference you were thinking about is between a flatbed scanner vs. a dedicated film/negative scanner.

    In which case, there is a significant difference.
     
  5. voodoocat

    voodoocat ))<>(( Supporting Member

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    Scanning negatives is a little more difficult because of the orange base that ksmattfish talks about. Dedicated slide/negative scanners include software that is pretty good about picking up on that color but you still need to do a bit of color balance to get it right. There is also 3rd party software like Vuescan which has profiles for different print film types.

    Once I got my scanner, I shot mostly slide film because of the colors and the ease of scanning compared to negative. It also has better grain. I found that ISO100 slide film > ISO100 print film in terms of color and finer grain.
     
  6. ajmall

    ajmall TPF Noob!

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    nope, it wasn't. :)

    my major question is cost because i'm very tempted to get a dig slr which obviously means no film and lab costs however, if i get a film scanner i would spend more money on slide film compared to print! decisions!!
     
  7. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

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    My Bad :?

    I'm saving for a DSLR and have thought about just getting a film scanner. The factor that I think sways the decision to the DSLR is that I will shoot a lot more if I don't have to constantly pay for film & precessing...even though it will take a while to make up the cost difference.

    Plus, it's a lot harder to impress your friends with a new scanner than it is with a new DSLR. :lol:
     
  8. ajmall

    ajmall TPF Noob!

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    so so true!!
     

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