Nelsons Ledges C&C please

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by redtippmann, Dec 30, 2008.

  1. redtippmann

    redtippmann TPF Noob!

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    Hi just wanted to get some comments on a few photographs I took earlier today. It's a bit grainy b/c of low light but here are a couple of them.

    1)
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    2)
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    3)
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    4)
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    5)
    [​IMG]

    These are all taken with my new lens that I got (Nikorr 50mm f/1.8) which turned out to be great!
     
  2. Jaszek

    Jaszek No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    I really like the first one. The other ones have good composition but not my style.
     
  3. redtippmann

    redtippmann TPF Noob!

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    thanks allot and I was just wondering if anyone thinks there is too much grain in there because im not sure if im too picky about it or is it in my imagination?
     
  4. dtornabene1

    dtornabene1 TPF Noob!

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    O.K. James, here we go!

    First, you will have to give me you flickr photostream address so I may view the photographs in their original size for me to see grain. At the size you've posted, no one will ever see grain.

    Let's talk about grain. In the digital world, what you call "grain" is actually noise. ISO stands for International Organization for Standardization. This organization makes things apples to apples.

    So, in the days of film, photographers needed a way to determine how fast or slow a type of film was. Slower film required longer exposure times and faster film could take pictures with less exposure.

    In the days of film, we use ISO to refer to the sensitivity of the image sensor on the camera. When you set the camera to a higher ISO you are telling it to be more sensitive to light, therefore you get more noise.

    There is a trade-off though, you need less exposure time. ISO speeds of 800 or more should be saved for lighting situations for which you can not control, say in a church where quite often you can not use a flash.

    The first thing I notice with the pictures posted is the available light. ISO 800 just isn’t needed here. Now you have less expensive glass (what we call our lenses), so your maximum aperture will be lower, say 3.5 or 5.6. This is still fast enough for you to shoot out doors without that high of ISO.

    Did you have your flash on? Don’t worry, I can tell you didn’t. You need your flash at all times. That does not mean you use it at all times, but have it with you. Photos 1,2,3, and 4 need flash (I don’t see a benefit using a flash on 5). There are shadows begging to be filled with light.

    Many times you will see a photograph taken outdoors and wonder how the photographer made it look so good. The answer is just about always due to lighting. This applies to people or any other subject.

    Up to now you might have thought using flash is limited to “freezing” the action or simply giving light to a dark room. In comes fill flash (many times you will see people just refer to this as fill). Using flash on photograph 1 would not have “frozen” the water, yet give light to the shadows to the rocks to the left, right, and beneath the water.

    Does this mean we use the flash on full power? Absolutely not. When using flash as a fill, indoors or outdoors, start at least -1 EV (exposure value). This is just a starting point. Later we will learn how to use directional flash and reflectors. Inexpensive things you can do to drastically change you photographs.

    Look at photograph 3. You are missing detail because the rock faces are not illuminated. As a side note on three, your aperture is too wide. All the rocks should be in focus. They are your subjects, not just one rock but the group. You have already isolated the rocks by blurring the background so close down the aperture to get the rock in front in focus.

    Last note on grain. Grain in film is good sometimes. Mostly when we shoot B/W (black and white). Grain gives the look of age, ruggedness, or attitude. Grain, however, should not be added via ISO adjustments (that’s just added noise not real grain). Grain should be added pp (post production).

    At this time, let’s focus on getting the pictures sharp and structurally sound before we work on the details. Just like building a house, we need a good foundation before we talk about painting the walls so-to-speak.

    I would like you to go back to these spots and retake the photographs with your flash. Let’s see what that does, O.K.?

    -Nick
     
  5. robbie_vlad

    robbie_vlad TPF Noob!

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    I like them, just need to fine tune. Listen to this ^^ guy, he knows what he is talking about. Great advice Nick, I learned a couple things myself :thumbup:
     
  6. dtornabene1

    dtornabene1 TPF Noob!

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    Thank you robbie vlad. We all learn from each other, but I do appreciate the nice comment.

    Just a F.Y.I., James is in my mentoring program. This is just an excerpt from a message sent to James. I like to put these up so others can see as well.

    -Nick
     
  7. bevin

    bevin TPF Noob!

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    Wow Nick, awesome response! I learned a lot from that too, cheers :)
     

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