new here and to photography

Discussion in 'Film Discussion and Q & A' started by agengo02, Oct 29, 2007.

  1. agengo02

    agengo02 TPF Noob!

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    hey guys im new on this forum and to photography in general. i found a pretty cool 35mm camera in my girlfriends trunk and have been having a blast taking pictures ever since. after doing a little bit of research i think i want to go the way of using a scanner to scan the negative and then just put it on a memory card and printing it at wal mart or something. my questions are in the development of the film. im assuming i would have to develop the negatives first then scan them on the scanner. is this the way to do it? any recomendations on scanners that work well for negatives? also i work at a paper plant and i handle negatives all day long. is it feasable to think that i can develop the film in the same chemistry that the large negatives get developed in? im going to get some cheap film and just shoot it off and then try some different speeds for the machines i use and see how they turn out.

    ok back to scanning. once the negative is scanned into the computer would i just have to invert the image to get the appropriate black and white image? also how would all this be done to produce a color image? and can i just save that image onto a flash memory card and go to walmart and print them off whichever ones i need??

    haha sorry about the jumbled mess! i guess i had a few more questions than i thought!

    thanks
     
  2. Alpha

    Alpha Troll Extraordinaire

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    1) Look for a scanner with a transparency lid. This is a requirement, not an option, for scanning negatives. Buy Epson.
    2) If you have any idea what the speeds, temperatures, or agitation times of the machines you work with are, then it might be possible to develop your negatives there. However, it's highly doubtful that the chemistry is even similar, let alone the same. Also, if you're working on machines designed for large negatives, their rollers will tend to have lots of problems holding onto anything smaller than 8x10, or 4x5 if it's a smaller machine.
    3) The scanning software will invert the image for you.
    4) Scanning software can also convert the negative color into normal ones automatically.
    5) Yes, you could put the image on a card.
     
  3. agengo02

    agengo02 TPF Noob!

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    wow that was exactly what i was looking for! ok im going to test it out with our machines and see how they turn out. im not expecting anything so i wont be let down if it dont work. would this scanner be ok?
    http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000HDWZLC/ref=dp_cp_ob_title_0/002-4348039-8571236

    for the chemistry do i just find chemistry kits online? how easy/hard is it to develop negatives at home for my intended purposes?

    thanks again
     
  4. doobs

    doobs TPF Noob!

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    Black and white is easy. Color is a little harder.

    You'll just need a light tight room and a sink with running water and you'll be fine. Easy stuff.
     
  5. frXnz kafka

    frXnz kafka TPF Noob!

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    If you're just developing negatives, you don't need a light tight room, you'll just need to buy a light tight bag like this: http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/91988-REG/Samigon_ESA917_Changing_Bag_Small_16x17_.html

    Black and white chemistry is pretty simple. Temperature control seems to be the biggest issue for color film, but with running water that shouldn't be a major problem. You can develop film anywhere. Kitchen, bathroom, whatever.

    For chemicals you'll want developer, stop, fixer, a hypo clearing agent (fixer remover), and a wetting agent so you don't get water spots (or you could just squeegee your film before hanging it to dry).
     
  6. Alpha

    Alpha Troll Extraordinaire

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    The maintenance of chemical temperatures in color development (both C41 and E6) is absolutely critical, and rarely, if ever, can be managed properly with running water alone. Temperatures should be within +/- 1 (preferably +/- .5) degrees C of the recommended values. Most people I know who develop C41 and/or E6 at home use automated processors, such as the Jobo CPE series. At the very least, they won't touch C41 chemistry without some instrument capable of maintaining such temperatures across their baths.
     
  7. doobs

    doobs TPF Noob!

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    I use water for a fixer remover. Works fine. When I'm doing film, I use Perma-Wash after that.
     
  8. frXnz kafka

    frXnz kafka TPF Noob!

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    I don't use fixer remover for prints, but I've always used it for film. Develop, stop, fix, rinse, fix remover, wash, photo-flo, dry.
     

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