New York Panorama

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by jasonkt, Aug 10, 2008.

  1. jasonkt

    jasonkt TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2007
    Messages:
    142
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Coney Island in Brooklyn, US
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    Yesterday on my rooftop in Coney Island, I decided to try my very first panorama. Any critique welcome! I didn't look up any tips before hand (although I have read the forum article a long time ago, I did this on a whim) so there really wasn't any planning. Also I didn't really do much more than overlap the photos so the crop isn't good (obviously) and the exposures and color are slightly off.

    I'm planning on coming back to this later tonight or tomorrow so any advice will be helpful. I'm also planning on taking a more serious approach to it in the near future with some new shots and a real tripod. But for now I had fun and that's cool too right?

    it's large so check out:

    http://www.jasonkip.com/brooklynpanorama.jpg
     
  2. sburatorul

    sburatorul TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jul 2, 2008
    Messages:
    369
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    a place few people heard of
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    its nice that you had fun and yes it is important however there are some bad aspects. don't know what program you used for this panorama but it didn't do a very good job, the photos aren't overlapped correctly. furthermore u have lens vignetting in the left side and its not very nicely looking... plus i can see some exposure differences.

    try setting your camera on a tripod and using manual, have all the pictures with the same settings of shutter aperture iso. for the panorama itself i suggest using hugin, its free and simple to use.
     
  3. Alex_B

    Alex_B No longer a newbie, moving up!

    Joined:
    Aug 30, 2006
    Messages:
    14,491
    Likes Received:
    206
    Location:
    Europe 67.51°N
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    I think it was not meant to be perfectly stitched, sburatorul.
     
  4. sburatorul

    sburatorul TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jul 2, 2008
    Messages:
    369
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    a place few people heard of
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    ok than i might be missing the point of this panorama... though i can't see what other point it may have :)

    if i am wrong please correct me
     
  5. Cybermg703

    Cybermg703 TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2008
    Messages:
    35
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Punta Gorda, FL
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    awsome! thanks for the comments also
     
  6. tirediron

    tirediron Watch the Birdy! Staff Member Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Jul 8, 2005
    Messages:
    37,417
    Likes Received:
    10,678
    Location:
    Victoria, BC
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    Having fun and learning are indeed what it's all about. I'll repost my handy-dandy, fifty-cent panorama how-to...

    John's basic 'How-to' guide to Panoramas...

    1. In order to get a good pano, your camera has to be level, and has to rotate around the nodal point. This is a theoretical point which can be taken as the point where the centre of the lens axis intersects the centre of the film plane/sensor. What this means is that you have to shoot from a tripod for best results.

    Therefore, put your camera on your tripod and level it. Even though my tripod legs and head both have levels built-in, I carry a small dollar-store spirit level in my camera bag to make sure everything is as close to level as I can get it.

    2. Once I'm satisfied that everything is level and square and my tripod is locked (except for the rotating axis) where I want it, it's time to work on the exposure. Another important factor is to NEVER SHOOT PANOS IN AUTO! Set your camera to a manual or semi-manual mode (I use full manual, but either shutter or apeture priority will work as well).

    Determine the range of your pano (eg the left and right limits) and then go through and meter the different areas. Find out what the camera is recommending as maximum and minimum exposure, and when you've done this for the full range of the image, then average the settings. Don't change these settings; yes some will likely be slightly under exposed, and some slightly over, but deal with it in post.

    3. Now you're ready to start shooting. I always start at the left-hand end of the intended pano and work right, simply so that the images are in the correct order when they're on my computer, but that's up to you. Expose the first image, and choose a landmark about 2/3 of the way to the right-hand side of the frame. Now, being careful to ensure that you don't upset your level, move your camera so that the left-hand edge of the frame lines up on the land mark you just chose. Ideally you want about a 30-35% (or 1/3) overlap between each image. Continue shooting in this manner until you have the whole sequence captured.

    4. Download and stitch using your favorite software.

    A few tips: With respect to the issue of exposure: If there is an extreme dynamic range within the pano, (say bright sun to deep shade) I will often bracket each image 1/3 stop on each side, so that for every image used in the pano, you actually expose three. This gives you a bit of latitude in terms of trying to produce an image with a pleasing and realistic dynamic range, but be warned, it often looks hokey.

    One of the most important tools you can have for taking panos (aside from a good tripod) are filters. There are two types, one is the circular polarizer (CPOL)for enhancing colours and deepening the blue in sky and the other is graduated neutral density(G-ND); these help to prevent blown skies and preserve detail on the ground. When using a CPOL, it's important to remember not to change it's setting through the course of the pano either. Find the optimum setting and use it at that setting for the whole image. Likewise with your G-ND; don't change their position or intensity.

    Here are a couple of my panos (left as links due to their size) taken in Chennia, Crete earlier this year:

    This one Is an overview of the city, using six images:

    http://www.rthtg.net/john/crete/Pano_City%20(Large).jpg


    This one is a view of the harbour in the old part of town, which was stitched from approximately 14 images, and in hi-res, weighs in about around 40Mb as .jpg!

    http://www.rthtg.net/john/crete/Pano...%20(Large).jpg


    Hope that's helpful, and answers some of your questions.
    ~John
     
  7. Crimsonandwhite

    Crimsonandwhite TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jun 22, 2008
    Messages:
    268
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Tuscaloosa, AL
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    Tired, you are the man, going above and beyond every time! I have been thinking about playing around with Panos and all this info is gold!
     
  8. tirediron

    tirediron Watch the Birdy! Staff Member Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Jul 8, 2005
    Messages:
    37,417
    Likes Received:
    10,678
    Location:
    Victoria, BC
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    :blushing: Thanks.
     
  9. Alex_B

    Alex_B No longer a newbie, moving up!

    Joined:
    Aug 30, 2006
    Messages:
    14,491
    Likes Received:
    206
    Location:
    Europe 67.51°N
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
  10. tirediron

    tirediron Watch the Birdy! Staff Member Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Jul 8, 2005
    Messages:
    37,417
    Likes Received:
    10,678
    Location:
    Victoria, BC
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
  11. TamiyaGuy

    TamiyaGuy No longer a newbie, moving up!

    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2007
    Messages:
    1,078
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Chelmsford, UK
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    That's some really fantastic advice, TiredIron. I might use some of it myself :D

    I do like the landscape, but I'm afraid that I can't take my mind off the technical faults in the photograph. I feel that if there was less vingetting, better alignment etc, I would be able to appreciate the photo much more.

    Just another thing to add to TI's post: Try not to shoot a pano in the extreme wide-angles of your lens; try to shoot at about 25mm on a crop-body sensor.
     
  12. jasonkt

    jasonkt TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2007
    Messages:
    142
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Coney Island in Brooklyn, US
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    well here is a first edit attempt, YEAH, IT'S BAD. I tried to use the healing brush and/or spot healing brush tool...and it didn't work so great. Trying to adjust each layers levels/colors/exposure etc to match each other was also harder than I imagined. Looks like what I really need to do is...take the pictures over :)

    Oh well, if you want to comment or leave suggestions, please do!

    I like them all...even cynical ones...reminds me that I need to put effort into the things I want to be good at.

    http://www.jasonkip.com/nypanorama.jpg
     

Share This Page

Search tags for this page

2008 ny panorama results

,

landscape