night lights on roads

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by dispic1, Aug 14, 2006.

  1. dispic1

    dispic1 TPF Noob!

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    there are a number of pics on here taken at night, whick show car lights going down roads. i am quite new to all this and would like to have a go. what do i need to get these shots?

    thank you
     
  2. JDS

    JDS TPF Noob!

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    I've never tried it either, but am eager to. Basically what you need is a long shutter speed. Leave it open for anywhere from 1 or 2 seconds to 20 and you should get some pretty cool shots. You may need to experiment with the aperture settings as well, but the main deal is your shutter speed.
     
  3. DepthAfield

    DepthAfield TPF Noob!

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    These are accomplished by using a long exposure time and a tripod.
     
  4. AluminumStudios

    AluminumStudios TPF Noob!

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    If you're newer to photography I'm going to assume you probably have some variant of a point-n-shoot digital?

    You'll need to put it in manual mode and set it for a long shutter speed (often point-n-shoot's are limited to 15-30 seconds.) A tripod is a must (Walmart sells usable cheap ones for $18.)

    Beyond those two requirements experiemnt and see what you like and what you get.

    Have fun,

    ~Bill
     
  5. Cuervo79

    Cuervo79 Guest

    adding to what aluminum said...
    more tips
    if you don't have a remote trigger (either cabled or infrared) put the camera in auto timer. that way you reduce the movement when shooting.

    interesting tip, the bigger the number of the F stop you can make the lights grow spikes and become like stars (you can also do this with a filter but it looks different)

    another very good tip is to have an iso the lowest as possible (be it in film or digital) so you can get less grain or noise... (although this will undobtedly expand your exposure time)
     

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