Nikura filters?

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by o hey tyler, Dec 21, 2009.

  1. o hey tyler

    o hey tyler Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    So when my lens was ordered (a christmas present from my grandfather), from Abes of Maine (which being a Mainer kind of agitates me that they're obviously based in New York) sold him a set of 3 Nikura filters. I've never had experience with them, but all together the pack of three costs 149.99. They gave him a deal for 49.99 since he was ordering a lens. So, my question is, has anyone used Nikura filters? I got a UV, CPL, and Fluorescent light correction filter.

    Don't worry, my hopes aren't too high.
     
  2. KmH

    KmH Helping photographers learn to fish Supporting Member

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    I'd never heard the brand name before.

    So, I did some online searching and most references I found lead back to Abes of Maine.

    I saw posts on other forums where Abe's sales people had pushed the filter set. Figure it's a high profit item for Abes and that their salespeople get a spiff for moving them.
     
  3. Derrel

    Derrel Mr. Rain Cloud

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    KmH's comments are accurate. Off-brand or store-brand filters are one of *the* highest-markup items in a camera shop. I love that "normally $149.95, but we'll let you have the set for $49.95." Filters can be bought in large quantities for as little as $2.00 each, then priced at $19.95 each, and played against name-brand filters at $29.95 or $39.95 each. Even at $49.95, the Abe's of Maine salesman probably earned a $7 spiff off of the $49.95 sale. If he had managed to nail your grandfather for $149 the spiff would probably have been $25-$30, and at $100 or so, probably a $15 spiff. That is the way retail camera filter sales has operated for decades. The development of the Chinese optical business has made this issue even bigger a problem than when the optics industry was mostly in Japan.
     

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