Polarizer filter for Sigma 30mm

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by jsrockit, Mar 10, 2008.

  1. jsrockit

    jsrockit TPF Noob!

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    I'm using a Nikon D60 and a Sigma 30mm lens. I would like a Polarizer filter to cut down on reflections in certain situations. I've read that cheap ones do more good than harm. However, I don't want to spend too much if I can help it. Anyone have a suggestion for a Polarizer that offers good bang for the buck...but is a step above the $30-40 versions?
     
  2. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

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    My philosophy, when it comes to filters, is to look at the range and buy one that isn't' at the top or the bottom of the range. The cheap ones are probably not very good and the top ones might be overpriced (although that's an unfair generalization).

    I would suggest a good brand name like Hoya.
     
  3. jsrockit

    jsrockit TPF Noob!

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  4. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

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    I don't pretend to know all about the multi-coatings on these filters. I do know that B&W is a top end brand that is expensive but said to be quite good.

    Maybe it's a good idea to just buy a good one, and then never have to upgrade.

    Also, I would suggest buying a larger filter. You can buy a step up ring and use a larger filter on a smaller lens...but if your filter is too small (if you get a bigger lens) would won't want to use a step down ring as it may cause vignetting.

    The slim filters are for wide angle lenses or for when you stack filters. Non-slim filters may stick out far enough to cause vignetting on some lenses. Probably not required for the Sigma 30mm.
     
  5. Socrates

    Socrates TPF Noob!

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    Doesn't that make it difficult to attach a hood?
     
  6. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Good point...but you may not want to use the hood with a polarizing filter anyway because it would make adjustment of the filter rather hard.

    Of course, you could use a screw mount hood, attached to the filter.
     
  7. Socrates

    Socrates TPF Noob!

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    Actually, I've always used a hood with a polarizer. I've always been concerned about the flat glass on a filter (compared with the curve on a lens surface) and the liklihood of picking up reflections. I would rotate the polarizer by grasping the hood as you had hinted. It worked fine for nearly fifty years of photography until I bought Nikon's 18-200 VR lens last week. Nikon's hood is not mounted on the filter and, as you suggested, the rotation is "rather hard," to say the least.
     
  8. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

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    I have several lenses with the bayonet mounting style hoods (including the Sigma 30mm F1.4). I do like that they hood can be reverse mounted onto the lens...because the alternative would be to make extra room for them in my bag...they might get left at home.

    The problem, of course, is that when you have a filter like a polarizer, it can be hard to rotate the filter with the hood on.

    Come to think of it....I don't think I've ever used a polarizer on my Sigma. This is a lens that I use indoors or for portraits, not for landscapes etc.

    With my main landscape lens, the 10-22mm, I do have a hood...but because of the extreme wide angle of view, the hood's diameter is practically double the diameter of the lens and it doesn't stick out very far either. It's sort of ridiculous for blocking light...but it does provide some physical protection. The point is, with that lens, there is no problem at all about being able to reach the filter with the hood on.
     

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