portrait filters

Discussion in 'Photography Equipment & Products' started by aaronou, Jun 9, 2006.

  1. aaronou

    aaronou TPF Noob!

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    Hello everyone .........

    I'm going to do some outdoor portrait photography this weekend to pump up my portfolio and technique. I'm using a subject that is easy going and comfortable with me (my sister).

    I am curious as to what filter would be good to create a softer mood. It's going to be hot and bright in Oklahoma this weekend so I am hoping for the best. I know that I could do this post production in CS2 but I am horrible in Photoshop. =)

    Also, if a filter is not the best equipment to create this effect, could someone suggest lighting or other equipment (reflector, flash, etc)

    Mod: if this should be in a technique section, I apologize. ;)
     
  2. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Could you show us an example of the effect you art trying to achieve?

    If it's going to be bright & sunny...look for a location that is shaded. Bright midday sun is terrible for portraits.
     
  3. markc

    markc TPF Noob!

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    I agree, but make sure that nothing else in the frame is in the bright sun either. Otherwise the shaded parts will look dim and cold. Pay attention to the background.

    Personally, I don't use any filters. If you want a cheap soft filter, you can try stretching some pantyhose over the end of the lens and hold it on with a rubberband. This won't make up for poor lighting though. Getting the right like is number one in my book.

    If indoors, position the subject next to a window that doesn't have direct light coming in. If there are sunbeams there, either wait for a cloud or close the curtains (if they are white and translucent). If outdoors, shoot in the morning or late evening when the sun is low in the sky. Direct overhead light is boring at best, and usually pretty nasty.
     

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