Protection from Humidity!!!

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by docphotog, Jun 26, 2009.

  1. docphotog

    docphotog TPF Noob!

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    Hello everyone I was wondering if you guys could tell me how to protect my camera and lenses from humidity! My camera will be down in the tropical weather for 5 months or so and I won't have access to air conditioning so any help would be greatly appreciated. Thanks!!!!
     
  2. blakejd

    blakejd TPF Noob!

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    I've been using one of these on my backpacking adventures in the very humid and currently wet Southeast. They are light, cheap and suprisingly durable. If you want something a little more beafy you could try a pelican case or heavy duty dry bag. unfortunately my recent research hasn't come up with very many economical photography specific options. Sea to Summit USA - Outdoor, Travel and Backpacking Gear
     
  3. Phranquey

    Phranquey TPF Noob!

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    There isn't much you can do about the humidity....it's everywhere all the time, but the thing you really want to avoid is drastic temperature changes that create condensation. If you happen to be camping, keep it in the camera bag at night (unless being used) to avoid dew formation. If you're not going to be in air conditioning, then your camera will pretty much stay acclimated.
     
  4. RONDAL

    RONDAL TPF Noob!

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    humidity isn't that bad, its the temperature changes as was mentioned that are gonna cause issues.

    Letting the camera slowly cool down before taking it into A/C'd buildings, keeping it out of places of temp fluctuation (like at night, early morning) are key to avoid the moisture condensing.

    Otherwise the only thing I could suggest was ziplock bagging stuff and silica gel packets
     
  5. docphotog

    docphotog TPF Noob!

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    Hey everyone thanks for your input. I am starting to run the AC at night, do you all think the temperature change the camera is experiencing when the AC gets turned on and off is ok?

    I have my camera and my lenses sealed in a vacuum bag (I tried to squeeze out most of the air) and I also put a container damprid (I couldn't find silica gels!) in the bag. I hope that does the trick!!!!!

    If you have any other tips that'd be great!
     
  6. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

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    As mentioned, you really want to avoid quick temp/humidity swings.

    For example, if you go from an air conditioned room/building, out into hot humid air, condensation will form on any cool surface. I had a heck of a problem with this when I was in Costa Rica. The solution is to allow your gear to warm up before exposing it to the air...so that's where the plastic locking bags are good. Take note that a padded camera bag will also act like a cooler, keeping your gear cool...so you can speed up the process by taking it out of the camera bag or at least opening it.

    As mentioned, it shouldn't be a problem if you are constantly in the humid environment...after all, most people who live in those environments (and all their stuff) is probably in that humidity all the time.

    One thing to be aware of is that if you leave something in a humid & stagnant environment, it could be susceptible to mold or fungus etc. So don't put it your camera bag while it's wet/damp and leave it closed up for weeks at a time...let it breathe.

    descecant | B&H Photo Video
     
  7. Samanax

    Samanax TPF Noob!

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    I live in Hawaii where the humidity is always pretty high and I don't do anything special for my camera equipment. Haven't noticed anything wrong with them because of the humidity yet. The only problem here is the humidity makes our dust "wet" and it really sticks to the sensor and makes wet swabbing pretty manditory when it's time to clean the sensor. The dust doesn't come loose when you use a blower. I turned off the self-cleaning sensor in my XTi and 40D as they really weren't doing anything but eat up the battery.

    Oh, no A/C in my house. Just natural ventilation with the windows open.
     

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