Questions

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by midlight21, Jul 10, 2008.

  1. midlight21

    midlight21 TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2008
    Messages:
    42
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Dallas, TX
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    Okay, so as much as I like that my husband gave me my current digital camera for Christmas, I'm finding that its not going to really meet my needs......and I really wanted a DSLR.... So, I'm selling my old laptop and saving money now for a DSLR, however I can't make up my mind which one I want and YES I've read reviews. So, I have a few questions for the respective owners of those that I am considering:


    1. For those with a D80, is there anything you don't like about it?
    2. For those with a Canon xTi, is there anything you don't like about it?
    3. If I go with a better DSLR, it will probably be a D200 or a 40D...so for the owners of those, is there anything you don't like about your DSLR?
    4. For those of you with Olympus DSLR's, what do you like and dislike about the DSLR you have?
    5. For all of you with any of the above DSLR's, what is your favorite lens and why?


    Side Note: Now....I didn't ask these questions to start a new "Nikon vs. Canon vs. whatever your FAVORITE DSLR manufacturer is" debate. So, please don't start one... I'm not asking you to vote for your favorite here, what I really want to know are the downsides to whichever DSLR you own.

    Thanks in advance for your answers. :D
     
  2. tinfish

    tinfish TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jul 1, 2008
    Messages:
    106
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Amarillo
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    I started with a D50 and now shoot with the D300. So I do not have a reply as far as specifics on the cameras on your list, but for what it's worth I love both my Nikons. If you do go with a Nikon be sure and get the 50mm 1.8. It is a great lens!!!! and for $100.00 (+/- a few dollars) you can't beat it.
     
  3. kundalini

    kundalini Been spending a lot of time on here!

    Joined:
    Jul 18, 2007
    Messages:
    13,601
    Likes Received:
    1,929
    Location:
    State of Confusion
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    I started with the D80 and later added the D300. One of the few dissapointments I had/have with the D80 is it's ability to handle ISO much above 800. From ISO 100 to 400, it performs beautifully. The D80 fit my hands much better than the Rebel.
     
  4. midlight21

    midlight21 TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2008
    Messages:
    42
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Dallas, TX
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    Tinfish, Kundalini - Was the D200 ever on your list of purchase possibilities? If yes (or no), what turned you off?
     
  5. manaheim

    manaheim Jedi Bunnywabbit Staff Member Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Sep 2, 2005
    Messages:
    14,394
    Likes Received:
    3,261
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    I have extensively used D70S, D100, D200, D300 and have worked a reasonable amount of time with the D60 and D80. I currently own a D100 and D300 and use the D300 pretty much exclusively. So... I can probably give you some decent opinions.

    First, the sub-bodies... (D60/D80)

    In general, the sub-camera bodies are a very different breed from the main bodies (D200/D300). The cameras are significantly lighter, less rugged, and intended as more of a transitional camera. (from point and shoot to more "serious")

    They have a variety of features to make automatic shooting of certain situations easier (such as "landscape" and "portrait" automatic modes), and generally are geared towards someone trying to learn the ins and outs of working with a different type of camera than a typical point and shoot. Some of them even come with nice DVDs to explain the ins and outs of photography.

    They are also designed to be cheaper (to make them more attractive to a point and shoot owner, as well as make them more accessible to everyone to hook them into this evil habit/hobby), so they cut quite a few corners. As I mentioned they are less rugged, but they also do things like give you a smaller screen, no autofocus motor (limiting lens choices a bit... except for the D80, which does have this), fewer dials and controls (making it a bit more challenging to work the device when you go into more manual modes), lesser high-iso capabilities, less speed, less software capabilities, etc. For an example, see my thread here on my review of the D60 from some hands-on experience.

    That being said, there isn't really anything wrong with the cameras. You can get just as beautiful shots... it just may take a bit more work and you may find that someone with a "more serious" cam might be able to outdo you here and there. Honestly, very rarely, but they do have a better tool, so they're going to be a bit less limited. You have to keep this in perspective, though... I think my D100 is an amazing camera, and in almost every way, all of these newer lesser cameras kick the snot out of my D100... the only real advantage my poor D100 has is that it is more rugged and can take the vertical grip. (I don't believe most of these cameras can... not sure.)

    Now, that being said... the D80 is really exceptional in my opinion. I recommend it to people all the time. It's really just a smallish step down from the D200. It's still clearly less of a serious camera than the D200, but the differences are no where near as significant as they are on any other camera in the sub-body line. It has a bit more capability, doesn't treat you like you're clueless, but still has the capabilities and features to help ease the transition if you need or want them.

    In summary on the sub-bodies... The D80 is a great camera. The other ones, in my opinion, are all kind of frustrating. They're fine... but frustrating. I would almost sooner buy a used D70S than a D40, and possibly even a D60. The D60 really annoyed me. Unless you are scrounging for cash to make this happen, if you decide to go with a sub-body, get a D80.

    Now onto the monsters... (D200/D300)

    These are both exceptional cameras. They're built like tanks, take no shortcuts, and are rich in features and capabilities.

    They are larger and heavier. No question. However, if you're getting into this hobby and worrying about the size difference between a D60 and a D200... you are going to have some problems. Both cameras are ungainly huge compared to most point and shoot cameras. Accept that these are all fairly large and go with it. The one exception to this is if you really are a tiny waif of a thing and can't practically handle a device of this size. Other than that, seriously ignore the weight stuff (or maybe get the D80 which is a reasonable compromise).

    On a quick summary judgement, there's generally no reason to buy the D300 unless you have the extra cash and figure what the hell. There is no doubt that the D300 is a better camera, but the jump in price is quite significant for technically not that much of a gain. The D200 is an exceptional camera. Most D200 owners I know aren't considering an upgrade to the D300 because there just isn't that much of a difference.

    Off the top of my head, the major notworthy improvements in the D300 are...
    • 12MP instead of 10MP
    • AMAZING big and bright LCD screen
    • Faster shutter speed
    • Very good high ISO noise reduction
    • Better viewing controls on the LCD
    Ummm... there are more, but those are the ones that jump to mind. There's no question that its a better camera... but $600 better? 50% better? (assuming I have my prices right... haven't looked in a bit) Anyway... probably not. I got the D300 because I was upgrading from a D100, so I figured I might as well go for the top one since it had been a while. (plus I make money off my cameras so it was a business expense... gotta love that.) :mrgreen:

    I am extremely happy with my D300, but the D200 I was using for about six months there was absolutely spectacular. As I say... both great cameras.

    I hope this helps. :)
     
  6. midlight21

    midlight21 TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2008
    Messages:
    42
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Dallas, TX
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    Thanks Manaheim! I can tell I'll be saving for a while b/c I'm leaning towards the D200....or D300 if the price comes down.
     
  7. manaheim

    manaheim Jedi Bunnywabbit Staff Member Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Sep 2, 2005
    Messages:
    14,394
    Likes Received:
    3,261
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    NP. I'm surrprised no one else had any comments, actually. Maybe I scared them off. I type fast. :lol:
     
  8. Kstrong

    Kstrong TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2008
    Messages:
    23
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Nova Scotia, Canada
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    I just got an Olympus E-410, so far I love it. The only problem that I have found so far is the lens that it comes with. You can get it with either a one lens kit, or two. I highly recommend the two lens kit. The one lens that I got is only a 14-42mm. It doesn't have a lot for zoom, actually, it really lacks.
     
  9. Dao

    Dao No longer a newbie, moving up!

    Joined:
    Mar 24, 2008
    Messages:
    6,252
    Likes Received:
    418
    Location:
    St. Louis
    Canon Xti user here. And I am also a beginner. This is just my 2 cents.

    Like:

    - I like the 9 AF focus points. It works better when I take some pictures of a stationary object in my home made mini studio. Also, I use the AF focus points sometimes as a reference when I composing the photos. For example, use it as a reference to make a horizontal line looks horizontal in the picture.

    - Being one of the popular camera, you can find more accessories from 3rd party.

    - Even with ISO 1600, as long as the picture is popular exposed, the image still look decent.





    Don't like:

    - I wish the camera take SD flash memory instead of CF. And Canon is listening, the newer model, Xsi and Xs can use SDHC.

    - For ISO, i wish it can do ISO3200

    - It only have Evaluative, Partial and Center-weighted average metering. A Spot metering will be nice.





    Other than that, I really like the camera.
     
  10. lockwood81

    lockwood81 TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2007
    Messages:
    887
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Daytona Beach
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    I own the Olympus e-510...used it for about a year and still love it...

    Likes: well I haven't had any other DSLR's so nothing to really compare it to. I guess built in Image Stablization, fast mirror lock-up, I'm a big guy so the camera being big is nice, easy menus, two different built in memory cards so I can have two cards in at once to save more photos.

    Dislikes: not good at high ISO's, small view finder (which I fixed with a purchased larger one), only three point focus.

    Favorite lens....I don't have the kit lenses. I have a 50mm f/2, 14-54mm f/2.8, and 50-200mm f/2.8 I love all of them, but I think the 50mm is quite sharp and great for portraits and macros so I would say its my favorite..
     
  11. prodigy2k7

    prodigy2k7 No longer a newbie, moving up!

    Joined:
    Apr 22, 2008
    Messages:
    1,665
    Likes Received:
    22
    Location:
    California, USA
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    I have a For Canon Rebel XTi

    To be honest, im telling the truth, there is nothing bad about this camera to me!!! Its perfect. I love it so much!
     

Share This Page