Remaining an undergrad

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by ibclc2, Nov 28, 2008.

  1. ibclc2

    ibclc2 TPF Noob!

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    My psychology professor in college (many years ago) said, "You want to live long? Have a hobby when you retire." So here I am with retirement a few years away, looking to develop a photography hobby. But I'm also a gadget guy and love small electronics. The idea of lugging around a bag with a DSLR and lenses, filters, flash etc., doesn't excite me. I have read articles about a few isolated photographers who are the exception and exclusively use point and shoots.

    So here's the question. I own an advanced Lumix point and shoot. Is it possible to develop an amateur-level, but serious photo hobby, and remain an "undergrad", never
    going to the SLR world? I am enticed by several other advanced point and shoots, like the Canon G10, and will probably end up owning a few. I would like to hear from people who are committed to being "undergrads" (anyone?), their successes and failures, satisfaction and frustration, hints and suggestions. Thanks in advance.
     
  2. chrisburke

    chrisburke TPF Noob!

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    i've heard nothing but good things about the G10 and recently saw a video where a professional used the G10 to do a full photoshoot for a magazine (the point of the video was to show people they dont need a big fancy camera to take nice pictures) I did a quick search for the video, but didnt have any luck
     
  3. AduNeButt

    AduNeButt TPF Noob!

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    The G10 is capable of putting out very good looking shots, but there are quite a few drawbacks that a P&S has over a DSLR that really can't be overcome. DSLRs allow more creativity and manual functionality. However, as a hobby, your camera should be as expensive and high tech as you feel it needs to be. If you are fine with the quality of pictures that a P&S can put out, then there's no reason to upgrade. However, if you find yourself looking for more control over your pictures, you may find yourself wanting to upgrade into the DSLR world.
     
  4. blash

    blash TPF Noob!

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    P&S's have quickly stepped up to the photo quality of a DSLR, especially with a bit of photoshopping. The main, truly tangible advantages that a DSLR has are:

    1) Interchangeable lenses - find me a P&S that can do fisheye shots, not to mention ultra-wide, high-powered telephoto, and perspective control.
    2) Manual control - with a P&S you don't have control over depth of field (i.e. blurry background) or shutter speed (objects are blurred and appear to be in motion).

    There are other advantages of course though. So if you just want to take quick urban-life photos, or maybe a couple landscapes, a P&S will probably do you just fine. For everything else, a SLR is mandated.
     
  5. austriker

    austriker TPF Noob!

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    if you are really good at composing photos and making them interesting then you can get away with using a point and shot.. i would really recommend a DSLR but you should just do what you want to
     
  6. Ron Evers

    Ron Evers Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    Incorrect! I can control all the above with both my Canon S5 or even my wife's A570 pocket camera.
     
  7. Dao

    Dao No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Yes Ron, you can control the DoF, but since the sensor size of the P&S camera is a lot smaller. When compare to a DSLR camera, it is a lot harder for a P&S as oppose to a DSLR to create the same kind of blur background image.

    In other words, If someone using a DSLR (i.e. Canon 5D) taking a picture using a 50mmm lens with aperture set as F/2.8. For the canon S5, even if it zoom to the equivalent focal length and set the same aperture. The DSLR camera will have a shadower DoF. I read that the sensor size and DoF is directly propotional.
     
  8. reg

    reg TPF Noob!

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    Quite!

    A camera with a sensor 2x smaller than 35mm (like my super duper fantastic Olympus E-510) has 2x depth of field than the same settings on 35mm.

    I couldn't even imagine the number on a point-and-shoot.
     
  9. Dao

    Dao No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    S5 sensor size is 5.75 x 4.31 mm and the 5D is 36 x 24 mm. Therefore it is about 5.6x.
     

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