Scanning 126 film in Nikon Coolscan V ED

Discussion in 'Film Discussion and Q & A' started by tallman23, May 12, 2009.

  1. tallman23

    tallman23 TPF Noob!

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    I'm going through the process of digitizing all the negatives in the family for the past 50 years ... over 3000 :confused:

    I recently ran across some Kodak Instamatic 126 negatives and would like to scan them; however, the perforations of the negative do not match up with the "sprocket" wheels of my Nikon Coolscan V ED film scanner. There is only one hole per frame on the negative as opposed to standard 35mm film with several holes per frame.

    Does anyone know if a film "punch" (think of a 3-hole punch) is made to convert 126 film to 35mm?

    What about creating a carrier strip, whereby the 126 film is attached (with tape?) to a 35mm strip. In other words, cut the edges off (with the perforation holes) the 126 and 35mm strips, then attach the 35mm perforations to the 126 film.

    Some other method?
     
  2. compur

    compur No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    You might find a lab that can dup them onto 35mm film.

    This company might be able to help you:
    Film Rescue International
     
  3. Dwig

    Dwig TPF Noob!

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    I feel your pain, believe me. That's about the size of my project, though mine includes images up to 3.5 x 5.5" B&W negatives and down to 16mm subminiture negs.

    While 126 is 35mm wide, the images are wider than 35mm negatives. Simply punching sprocket holes won't work well as it would require punching through the image area on on side, usually the top of the image. 35mm standard images are 24mm wide x 36mm long. 126 images are 28mm square by the standards though some cameras threw images as large as 30mm square.

    Your best bet may be to mount the negs as slides and use a slide carrier in your scanner. This will at least center the 126 image in the scanner and not require any permanent alteration of the negative. I don't know if there would be any issues with getting the scanner to deal with the mounted slide carrier while treating the images as negatives. The EPSON Scan and SilverFast software apps that came with my EPSON v700 scanner don't tie the neg/pos selection to the carrier so no problem would occur.

    On my scanner, I deal with things like this by adapting a larger carrier (e.g. 120 film) to hold the narrower film. I've done this for 127 and 126 in a 120 carrier and various larger antique roll film sizes in a 4x5 carrier. I haven't tackled any of the 110 and 16mm subminiture images yet, but they'll go into modified 35mm carriers with no difficulties. I generally create "extensions" for the odd films out of two layers of thin black construction paper that allow the edge of the film to slip in and that have a width that builds the narrow film out to the width of the carrier.
     
  4. tallman23

    tallman23 TPF Noob!

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    Thanks for the link; unfortunately, Film Rescue International no longer scans negatives. Instead, they recommended Scan Digital which does scan 126 film.... at $1.58 per frame! With approximately 1500 of my scans being 126 film, that would cost over $2,000! :thumbdown:

    That sounds like quite a process; but a process that you've mastered. By doing some additional research, I discovered that Nikon made a 126 scanner accessory for my scanner, the FH-3.
    Moreover, another contact pointed me in the direction of a company who fabricates custom scanning accessories. Nikon CoolScan 126 (Instamatic) film strp adapter (holder)

    It appears Film Scan USA also makes adapters for Epson scanners as well.

    Cheers
     
  5. compur

    compur No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    I didn't suggest that they scan your negatives. I suggested asking them
    (or another lab) if they can dup (meaning duplicate) them onto 35mm film
    so you can scan them.
     
  6. Jeff Canes

    Jeff Canes No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    I've the 126 filmscan holder for the Nikon; work well and i'm happy with it. But you have to remove some parts from the slide holder to use it. And it's only does one frame at a time so it would be slow. IMO it is one of the better option for your project.
     
    Last edited: May 13, 2009
  7. tallman23

    tallman23 TPF Noob!

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    Thanks for your input...I'm leaning toward this option.

    If you turn the MA-21 slide scanner over (so it's oriented upside-down) do you remove the white - plastic lever arm? It's about 1.5 inches long and rounded on one end?

    Is that the part to remove? Does the FH-3 documentation explain which part to remove?
     
  8. tallman23

    tallman23 TPF Noob!

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    Hmmm... sorry to misinterpret. I contacted Film Rescue and Scan Digital and neither has the ability to duplicate 126 film to 35mm. Scan Digital can digitize the images, but that's $1.58 per image.
    Looks like digital (with a scanner adapter) is the most cost effective option.
     
  9. Dwig

    Dwig TPF Noob!

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    It takes a little bit of work to create the adapters, but they are reusable if made carefully. Once made, there is little additional effort in using them. I've made them for 127 and 126 in 120 carriers along with 116/616, 122, and a couple of other odd sizes in 4x5 carriers.
     
  10. Jeff Canes

    Jeff Canes No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Yes, the ma-21 snaps a part, you remove the back stop, plastic lever and front door, it easy to remove and put back together, except for put the door spring back on door, works fine without the spring
     
  11. filmscanusa

    filmscanusa TPF Noob!

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    I see users coming to our site (filmscanusa.com) from this forum.

    We have several instruction pdf downloads including how to disassemble and modify MA-21.

    Clarification: Nikon OEM FH-3 does not require any type of modification to MA-21. This is Nikon 35mm film holder. We don't use the FH-3, finding it time consuming and overly difficult.

    MA-21 MOD:
    This simple and reversible modification removes the internal slide stops, allowing a holder to extend a full 5" into the MA-21. This will hold a full four frames of 126 film (one frame at a time).

    This works with our holders, or do-it-yourself made holders.

    Most of our holders including the 126 have a "detent" notch as a stop to quickly position each frame in scanner.

    We do not remove the front door or door spring.

    We have used this setup in house for years, scanning thousands of 126, 110, MINOX, APS, you name it.

    Hope this info is of help in your project.

    Darrell
     

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