Shooting in full sun using a reflector

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by CThomas817, Oct 16, 2017.

  1. CThomas817

    CThomas817 TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Aug 28, 2017
    Messages:
    50
    Likes Received:
    1
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    Next week I am experimenting with a few families shooting on what may be midday on a sunndy day. If the sun is in full force, I plan to put the sun behind them as best I can and use a reflector. I am going to be in an open field so artificial lighting may be a challenge due to lack of electricity and I don't have a battery powered speedlight. Anyway, I have 50" sliver/white reflector. How big of a reflector do you think I need for a family of 4 sitting on the ground or standing close together?


     
  2. tirediron

    tirediron Watch the Birdy! Staff Member Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Jul 8, 2005
    Messages:
    40,540
    Likes Received:
    12,251
    Location:
    Victoria, BC
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    I would want at least 3x6'.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  3. Derrel

    Derrel Mr. Rain Cloud

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2009
    Messages:
    39,865
    Likes Received:
    14,957
    Location:
    USA
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    48" x 72" is my standard, go-to size for outdoor shoots. A rectangular reflector of that size has a LOT of surface area...a 50-inch-diameter round reflector has less area, but might be able to do the job. Kind of depends I guess.
     
  4. CThomas817

    CThomas817 TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Aug 28, 2017
    Messages:
    50
    Likes Received:
    1
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    Thanks!!
     
  5. Designer

    Designer Been spending a lot of time on here!

    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2012
    Messages:
    15,991
    Likes Received:
    3,995
    Location:
    Iowa
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    I think the 50-inch size would be o.k., as long as the family is in one group, and fairly close to each other.

    If you haven't thought about it yet; who is going to hold/direct the reflector? I once asked my grandson to direct a reflector, and I was constantly ... CONSTANTLY... going over there and making small adjustments to the angle of the reflector. As is very typical of a young man with family all around, his attention wandered, and with it, the reflector.

    Good luck!
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  6. Braineack

    Braineack Been spending a lot of time on here!

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2013
    Messages:
    11,044
    Likes Received:
    4,276
    Location:
    NoVA
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    I was just using a 42"? reflector with a three subjects -- first two subjects got the light just nicely, furthest person got nearly none of it.
     
  7. Designer

    Designer Been spending a lot of time on here!

    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2012
    Messages:
    15,991
    Likes Received:
    3,995
    Location:
    Iowa
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit


    I wonder why you would do this. Why not use the sun as your key light?

    Admittedly, midday sun is the most difficult, so you will learn a lot about that, but I don't know if using a reflector with midday sun is a good plan.

    I think you should purchase a speedlight. You'll need one someday anyway, so maybe you can get one before that experiment, so you can experiment with a reflector and a speedlight. Find out which one you like better or can deal with better.
     

Share This Page