Sort of new to the world of photography

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by Sardine, Apr 25, 2008.

  1. Sardine

    Sardine TPF Noob!

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    Hi there.

    I'm 16 and I'm really interested in photography (duh). I started off with a really basic Konica Minolta with 3x zoom and video recording with no sound (fat lot of help that is). My family thought my photo's were pretty good, and I did too (most of the time). I got more and more interested and decided to get a newer camera with more zoom.

    I saved for a year and got my baby. A Fujifilm s8000. I'm afraid to say I that I wouldn't recommend it. The multi-shot is extremely slow, and I find the settings complicated. On the plus side, it has 18x zoom (yes, I need 18x zoom!), and 8mp's. Useful.

    Unfortunately most of the photo's taken using the Minolta are better than the Fujifilm's :( But hey.

    I also have a good old fashioned Carl Zeiss. Yep, it weighs a ton and uses film. But you know what? The photo's are amazing. It's trickey at first, but once you get the hang of it, it's really rewarding.

    I'm still learning about aptature and shutter-speed etc. So any advice there would be greatly appreciated (advice like what settings to use when you're taking photo's of fast-moving people in a darkish room.)

    I like taking photo's of landscapes, aircraft, and animals. I also take loads of random photo's, and it's proving to be quite fun.

    Anyways, Sardine, out.
     
  2. ryan7783

    ryan7783 TPF Noob!

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    if you haven't already, go get "Understanding Exposure" by Bryan Peterson. It's an easy read with lots of pictures to show exactly what he's talking about. Also pick up "Understanding Digital Photography" by him too.
     
  3. carlostau

    carlostau TPF Noob!

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    Ditto, get "Understanding Exposure" by BP. Very easy and fun to read
     
  4. deudeu

    deudeu TPF Noob!

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    There are also loads of good online tutorials. That's if you don't feel like buying a reading this kind of book.
     
  5. JimmyO

    JimmyO TPF Noob!

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    Welcome!

    What kinds of photography are you intrested in?
     
  6. Mav

    Mav TPF Noob!

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    Welcome, and there's lots of good stuff in my sig. :)
     
  7. Sardine

    Sardine TPF Noob!

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    Thanks :)

    I live in South Africa, so I'm not sure if I'll find those books, but I'll have a look.

    I've looked at online tutorials, and to be honest, I got a bit bored.

    I like all types of photography, really. I find a photo of tomato sauce on lettuce interesting. I tend to take random photo's of my shoes. Anything that's different catches my eye, really.

    Thanks Mav :D
     
  8. christopher walrath

    christopher walrath No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    You have a creator's eye there, matey. Try the progression of the sun around the curvature of a rusted and paint peeling gas tank in a series on images to see the sun moving and the shadows moving as well. I have people tell me 'Better hurry. That hose is gonna run away any second.'

    Welcome
     
  9. Sardine

    Sardine TPF Noob!

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    Uh... ok.

    Thanks.
     
  10. Alex_B

    Alex_B No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Welcome :)
     
  11. Jedo_03

    Jedo_03 TPF Noob!

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    Tomato sauce on shoes...??
    I actually like tinned sardines in tomato sauce...
    Seriously...
    Most / All digital cameras are pretty accurate in auto mode (unless the light is a bit difficult, yeah?) so spend a bit of time pointing yr camera around and looking at the numbers in yr viewfinder and noting the settings yr camera chooses... take a shot evry now and agin - write the numbers down on yr wrist with a biro (paper is boring Ya..?) if yu run out of wrist then try the top of yr leg (start at the top and work down to yr knee)
    What yu will find is that yr camera always - that is ALWAYS - adjusts the TONE of yr image to 13% grey...
    Shooting a milky skinned bride wearing a white dress against a white background..?? Camera thinks... WOW... too bright man - gotta tone this down to 13%...
    Shooting a black cat eating a black rat under a house in Port Elizabeth..?? Camera thinks... WOW... too dark man - got tone this up to 13%
    RESULT = under-exposed Bride: Over exposed Cat
    Solution..? Decide how BRIGHT or DARK is your frame: dial exposure comp up or down to suit: UP for the Bride: Down for the Cat: take a test shot: LOOK AT THE HISTOGRAM: does it over-run on the left or the right..?? ADJUST the EXP COMP: shoot again: LOOK AT THE HISTOGRAM: aim for SHOOTING AS FAR TO THE RIGHT as you can WITHOUT going over the right hand edge (clipping)
    WHITE SNOW is 2 STOPS BRIGHTER THAN 13% Grey - dial in +2 Exp Comp
    BLACK CATS is 2 STOPS DARKER THAN 13% Grey - Dial in -2 Exp Comp
    Or you can change yr aperture +/-2 stops or your shutter speed +/- 2 stops...
    LOL - Play with it... It's yrs...Yu can do whatevr yu want with it...
    Important part is get out there and shoot it and see what....
    <BTW> what part of SA you from... I was many years of my mis-spent youth in SA... The Cape, Port Elizabeth, Durban, JoBerg...
    Anyways... keep shooting...
    Jedo
     
  12. davidfromoz

    davidfromoz TPF Noob!

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    On the subject of taking a fast moving subject in a dark room. You have a few options I think.

    If you're not using it now I suggest you try out manual or aperture priority mode on the camera. Set the aperture nice and large (small number). That way you can achieve a faster shutter speed for the same exposure. In manual mode you'll need to set an appropriate shutter speed, in aperture priority the camera will do that for you. With a large aperture you will sacrifice depth of field, but be able to achieve a faster shutter speed.

    If you're still getting blurring then you have a few more options.

    Firstly, you can increase the ISO. As you increase the ISO your image will get noisier (grainy) but you will be able to have faster shutter speeds at the same aperture to help you freeze the subject. On your digital camera thats easy, just adjust the setting. On a film camera it means getting a different film, so you'll need to plan in advance for a whole roll of pics at that setting.

    You could also light the scene with a flash, turn on a light, open a window or something like that.

    Finally, you might be able to do something creative with the movement. Allow the distortion caused by the fast movement and slow shutter speed and find a way to make it look good. example, cars light moving on a road will become lines with slow shutter speeds and can sometimes look good.

    cheers,
    david
     

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