The Abandoned Garden

Discussion in 'Landscape & Cityscape' started by Mistilyn, Aug 25, 2007.

  1. Mistilyn

    Mistilyn TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Dec 21, 2006
    Messages:
    23
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    New Hampshire, USA
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    I was bored at a yardsale with my mother today and started looking for things to photograph. The most interesting thing in the yard at the time was a small garden that used to be mine. It has not been tended since I moved out of the house. I discovered this little planter that I completely forgot about.

    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]
     
  2. Mistilyn

    Mistilyn TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Dec 21, 2006
    Messages:
    23
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    New Hampshire, USA
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    Thank you everyone for looking at my photos!!
     
  3. LaFoto

    LaFoto Just Corinna in real life Staff Member Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2004
    Messages:
    34,814
    Likes Received:
    814
    Location:
    Lower Saxony, Germany
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    Hey, Mistilyn, this is the first time I am seeing your photos. And especially the first is very enjoyable. Quite an endearing little scene you saw there and framed into these two photos. The hot spots on the wellingtons (gum boots) in the second throw me off that one a little, but all in all they are nice.

    Now tell me: WHAT is the little plant you planted back then? That which now looks like a veritable tree trunk?
     
  4. Mistilyn

    Mistilyn TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Dec 21, 2006
    Messages:
    23
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    New Hampshire, USA
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    I agree. The hot spots are a little much. I'm not sure how to tone those down with my little camera. I use an Olympus D-545 zoom (4 megapixel). If anyone has any suggestions, please feel free to help me learn.

    The garden was built around the tree whose trunk you can see in the picture. The tree is a yellow birch, Betula alleghaniensis.
     

Share This Page