The Killing Fields

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by Commonman, Jan 4, 2007.

  1. Commonman

    Commonman TPF Noob!

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    I recently watched the movie, The Killing Fields. In the movie, they need to make a passport photo in a very short time with limited resources. John Malkovich plays the part of a photojournalist who tries to accomplish the task. Something goes wrong. Does anyone know what happened? Why did the photo turn out blank? Was it not fixed properly?
     
  2. The_Traveler

    The_Traveler Completely Counter-dependent Supporting Member

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    yes
     
  3. Commonman

    Commonman TPF Noob!

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    Traveler - I don't understand. Can you elaborate. What is the tube thing? Can you provide more detail as to what you think (or know) to have gone wrong with the passport photo?
     
  4. The_Traveler

    The_Traveler Completely Counter-dependent Supporting Member

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    The movie is a pumped-up-for-the-movies story that is based on real events. Sidney Schoenberg may still write for the NY Times and Dith Pran may still be a photojournalist. Unfortunately Haing Ngor, the actor who portrayed Pran, was murdered several years ago.

    I don't recollect the film perfectly, but I do remember the excitement when John Malkovitch was able to get a print for Pran's passport but the print quickly blackened when it was exposed to light. This is typical of a photographic print when it has not been rinsed in a stop bath and 'fixed'. I don't remember if this was a direct print or they somehow got a negative first but if you are interested in the chemistry of the process, here is a good link that gives a rundown on how this entire thing works - http://www.cheresources.com/photochem.shtml

    I was being facetious about the 'tube things' and meant by that, different lenses to use. I am not a 'gearhead' but I am loyal to the Nikon stuff that I use.

    This question was posted at a coincidental moment. I am just preparing to leave next Tuesday for 5 weeks in Cambodia and Laos and will be visiting those killing fields described in the movie.

    If you are interested in photography, this is the best site I have ever come across. TPF has a wide range of involved participants whose skills range from very beginners with point & shoot cameras to seasoned professionals with the highest calibre of expensive equipment. You can get help and comment on your photos and develop your skills.
     
  5. ksmattfish

    ksmattfish Now 100% DC - not as cool as I once was, but still

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    If it turned black rapidly in light it means there was still developer on the print. A print that is developed and stopped, but not fixed would darken over time, but not right before your eyes.
     

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