Tilt-Shift lenses in general, for the Canon EOS system specifically

Discussion in 'Photography Equipment & Products' started by Iron Flatline, Nov 6, 2007.

  1. I'm considering buying a Tilt-Shift lens to fine-tune (read: add a layer of masochism) to my landscape excursions.

    I am interested in harvesting the accumulated experiences from this group. What should I seek out, and what should I avoid when buying or working with such lenses?

    Specifically, I have a Canon camera (a 5D) and am considering the brand's Tilt-Shift lenses. They make three kinds, the 24mm f/3.5 L, the 45mm f/2.8, and the 90mm f/2.8. They each cost about the same, around $1,000 at B&H. The 24 is an "L" lens, which may have something to do with weather-proofing, not sure.

    Any thoughts or comments?
     
  2. Jeff Canes

    Jeff Canes No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    I’ve never considered using a T/S lens for landscape. What do you expect to gain? I've got one for the older FD Canon but never use it

    I have two also, first all T/S are manual focus. Second there are Russian made T/S lens, you could like get all three length for less $1000
     
  3. Helen B

    Helen B TPF Noob!

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    I agree with Jeff - I've never considered using a T/S lens for landscapes on 35 mm. I use tilt for landscapes in MF and LF but never felt the need for it in 35 mm. Using shift for architecture and tilt for close-up work is a different matter. If I didn't have larger formats my opinion might be different - I can see that using tilt could be an advantage at times if you were going for the ultimate quality in 35 mm landscape.

    Were you thinking of using it for increasing or decreasing the amount in focus, or a bit of both?

    Best,
    Helen
     
  4. Spoe

    Spoe TPF Noob!

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  5. Alpha

    Alpha Troll Extraordinaire

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    A couple things come to mind.

    First, if you're using the T/S abilities for perspective correction, then I see far less of a reason to go with a 45mm or 90mm. They aren't nearly wide enough on a 35mm body. At least with the 90mm, you'd have to shoot from some rather odd angles in order to produce a level of distortion that you'd need to correct. Perhaps it has a bit more use with the 45mm, but I really think it would shine (and hence would be worth the money) at 24mm where it's really needed. As I mentioned in my architectural photo thread, I'm gonna be proofing that gig with the 14mm 2.8L on an aps-c body, which produces a distortion level that's roughly comparable to the 24mm on a FF body. I won't be shooting many of the actual shots with it because I can't correct except minimally in PS.

    On the other hand, if you're just looking to blow some cash, you could do some really cool portraits with a 90mm t/s.

    In other news, does anyone know much about the Hartblei glass? I've though about picking up one of these for my 645.
     
  6. Hmmm... thanks guys.

    No, it's not JUST for landscape photography. It's also for shooting architecture - something I was actually going to do for a living when I was learning how to shoot in the 80s.

    I figured the wider one would make the most sense. For me the 90mm for portraits would be a novelty thing, and in that case a $100 LensBaby will do the trick.

    I want to increase the focus. Actually, I have some subjects in mind and want to print very large. I don't want to adjust in Photoshop because that just pulls pixels and then makes it softer. So I thought a T-S might make a nice Christmas present to myself.
     
  7. Alpha

    Alpha Troll Extraordinaire

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    Think of it this way. If you want a tighter shot, as opposed to switching to a 45mm lens, you could just get in closer. In architectural work, it would almost always be easier to get closer to your subject than further away. If getting closer produces more distortion, that's okay...that's what the T/S is for.

    The 24mm is simply a better lens for this application, there's no question in my mind of that.
     
  8. lostprophet

    lostprophet No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    well I have a 24mm TSE in the shop so if you want a few test shots let me know, only problem at the moment is that we have sold out of FF bodies although a little bird tells me a mkIII should be with us in a day or two :mrgreen:

    not sure about the weather proofing on the 24 as its a very old lens, it has the same build as the other 2 but the glass in better hence the L and red ring

    I was going to nab it last weekend for my powerstation shots but forgot to take it home DOH!
     

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