Using Canoscan 8800F scanner

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by hemang, Sep 18, 2009.

  1. hemang

    hemang TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Sep 18, 2009
    Messages:
    7
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Mumbai
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    Hello all, I have recently purchased a CanoScan 8800F scanner to scan old photos, slides and negatives. I am opening the ScanGear software through XnView. While scanning there are a number of options to select. I am using resolution of 2000dpi for 35mm negatives and 600dpi for color or B&W pics. My question is, should I use the options such as AutoTone, Unsharp, Fading correction, Remove dust, Remove grains etc before I scan or I should use these later if want to print only. Without all these options can I correct old faded pictures after scanning in a free software?
    Kindly advise.
     
  2. chemqueen

    chemqueen TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Nov 23, 2008
    Messages:
    44
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Dallas, TX
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    I would suggest trying it. I use a Nikon scanner and there is a similar program I can run, and sometimes it is worth it and sometimes it is not. I find it works great to remove scratches, dust, and fingerprints but I like to still use Photoshop for color enhancements. If it is like mine, it takes a bit longer to process than not using it, so if you are just trying to get all your 35mm pics into digital format for nostalgia sake, then it may not be worth the extra time it will take. If you are aiming for artsy work, then I might try it both ways and see which one you like.
     
  3. hemang

    hemang TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Sep 18, 2009
    Messages:
    7
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Mumbai
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    Thanks for the reply. Yes, this one does take a longer time too. But it does remove scratches and grains and does fade correction well. I do not have any idea how to do these things independently. I don;t have photoshop but mostly use free software. Can i attach some pictures from my hard disk to ask a question? How do I do this?
     
  4. chemqueen

    chemqueen TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Nov 23, 2008
    Messages:
    44
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Dallas, TX
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    I've never added photos, but I know you can because folks do it for C&C. I'd check the forums because I'm sure they tell us :)

    Mine I can only sort of do them independently, but I think it serves its purpose and is better than having to edit it later in most cases. I've seen a couple of free software packages that could probably do it, too, but cannot remember what they were now that I broke down and got PhotoShop.
     
  5. Dwig

    Dwig TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Mar 11, 2009
    Messages:
    1,261
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Key West FL
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    Its generally best to do as much of the color and density correction in the scanning software as practical.

    Personally, I use an EPSON v700 and use EPSON's own EPSONScan software most of the time (I also have SilverFast). I've found the auto exposure, auto color, and "Color Restoration" (probably much like Canon's "Fading" correction) quite reliable, though I do often make manual adjustments, particularily with poor originals.

    Dust removal is a different issue. My scanner and software both support Digital ICE and EPSON's own dust reduction method. Digital ICE works well on most, but not all, films. EPSON's works on all media, even prints, but is often either less effective or more prone to generating odd artifacts. Both can be rather slow working I often find manual dust removal preferable to the artifacts generated in auto dust removal.

    Scanning prints at 600ppi is somewhat overkill. No commercial print papers can hold detail that fine. Generally 300ppi will capture all of the detail in the print. The higher scanning resolution only improves the resolution of dust, tears, and scratches. If a print will ultimately be enlarged, then its valuable to scan at higher resolution since the image will needed to be upsampled otherwise.

    For film, I would generally suggest a higher scanning resolution. 2000ppi is fine for large format sheet film and antique large roll film where the camera's lenses were marginal and grain is rather large. With modern high quality medium format, I would suggest 3200ppi and with 35mm something between 3200ppi and 4800ppi if you are needing to capture all of the detail in the image. A lower scanning resolution would be fine, though, if your use will only be for small snapshot sized prints or for web display.
     
  6. hemang

    hemang TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Sep 18, 2009
    Messages:
    7
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Mumbai
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    I guess I would have to try different things and then fix what is best. I have just done some different scans and given the images for printing to see what comes out best. Thanks for the advices.
     

Share This Page

Search tags for this page
can i stil use my old canoscan 8800f
,
canon canoscan 8800f dust removal
,
canonscan 8800f select resolution
,
canoscan 8800f
,
canoscan 8800f forum
,
canoscan fading correction
,
canoscan forum
,
how to use a canoscan 8800f
,
how to use canonscan 8800f
,

how to use canoscan 8800f