Using flash in portrait position

Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by Loudog, May 23, 2005.

  1. Loudog

    Loudog TPF Noob!

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    I'm interested in finding out what people use to offset their flash unit when they're shooting in portrait position - as opposed to landscape position. Is there anything less elaborate than those "potato masher" set-ups?
    Thanks in advance.
     
  2. Loudog

    Loudog TPF Noob!

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    c'mon! There's a Stroboframe type thing, to flip the camera and the flash stays at 12 o'clock, but that's pricey and gay. There has to be a better idea. Lets hear it! I have a Vivitar pro flash and I use minolta srt ( that's manual ) series slr's.
     
  3. Christie Photo

    Christie Photo No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Someone just asked me while I was shooting a wedding this past weekend why I hold my strobe in my hand and don't use a bracket. Being immersed in my work, I simply told him so I can put the strobe just where I want it. I suppose this would have been a better answer.
     
  4. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

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    I try to bounce the flash when ever I can. So if I'm shooting in vertical orientation, I rotate the flash to bounce off of the ceiling or I tilt it to bounce off of a wall.

    In an ideal set up like a studio, off camera lights would really be best.
     
  5. Loudog

    Loudog TPF Noob!

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    I bounce the flash whenever possible as well. I have a lumiquest hood which works well too. Regardless, I'd still be interested in situating the flash at 12 0'clock to the lens, which is my problem when shooting in portrait position. Also, I shoot outdoors this time of year ( I'm Canadian .... as soon as it's above minus 10 outside, we're outside - woohoo! summertime!! ) and the flash is mostly for fill. Hard to bounce outdoors. I may end up holding the flash with my hand, or duct taping it to my forehead.
     

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