What Macro lens?

Discussion in 'Photography Equipment & Products' started by Gem, Sep 29, 2005.

  1. Gem

    Gem TPF Noob!

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    Three weeks ago my husband bought me a wonderful present - a Canon EOS 20D.:D
    With it (Kit) came a EF-S 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 lens, and a EF 55.200mm f4.5-5.6 II USM is on order.
    I really like Macro photography, though. So, I am looking at the EF-S 60mm f2.8 Macro USM, and the EF 100mm f2.8 Macro USM.
    Has anyone used them with an EOS 20D before? If so, how do you rate them? Which one would you recommend?
    I only ever used a basic film SLR before, so this is quite new to me, so any advise would be greatly appreciated.
     
  2. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Welcome to the forum.

    I've heard great things about the 100mm EF macro...and I thought that the EF-S 60mm is basically the same lens...just in a reduced focal length EF-S version.

    There is also an EF 50mm Macro lens available.

    One thing to consider is what equipment you might already have...and what you might have in the future. If you have a film EOS camera, I'd go with the EF lens...because it will be usable on both the film & digital cameras...however, the EF-S lens will not work on the film camera, only the digital.

    Also, the C-sized sensor in the 20D may be a passing phase. Canon just came out with the 5D, which has a sensor the same size as 35mm film...and is less than half the price of their flagship full frame digital SLR. Rumors are that by 2007, full frame DSLR cameras could be less than $1500. This might mean that EF-S lenses could become obsolete for newer cameras. Of course, that may not happen at all...it's just speculation.

    I've got a 20D and an old film EOS camera...so I ponder these questions myself. I have one EF-S lens...and I would only buy more if it was a really great deal....becasuse I hope to someday have a full frame DSLR.
     
  3. Gem

    Gem TPF Noob!

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    Hi Mike,

    Thanks for your reply.

    Well, I do not have a film EOS camera, so at the moment it doesn't really matter whether the lens will fit another camera. I am also not planning on replacing my 20D for quite a looooong time - unless I win the lottery, in which case I wouldn't worry about purchasing a few extra lenses anyway. :mrgreen:
    So, basically, I still don't know what to do.

    Does the smaller sized D20 sensor make a big difference when used with an EF lens? What exactly is a C-sized sensor (I'm not into all the technical stuff - yet)?
     
  4. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Well...it does make a difference...but only when you compare it to what you know about 35mm SLR cameras.

    The sensor on a 20D is smaller than a 35mm piece of film. So if you use a regular EF lens (designed for a film camera), the sensor (& the view finder) only sees the middle part of the image. The result is that you get a narrower field of view than you would get, with the same lens on a film camera. The 'cropping factor' is 1.6 so if you had a 50mm lens on your 20D, it would feel the same as an 80mm lens on a film camera.

    Does this really matter to you? Probably not. Just look through the view finder...that's what you have.

    If you don't plan on upgrading...or using film, then EF-S lenses are great for you. They may not hold their value as well as EF lenses...but if you are going to use the lens...that should not matter much either.

    I've probably confused you now....sorry :drunk:

    I'm going home now :roll:
     
  5. Digital Matt

    Digital Matt alter ego: Analog Matt

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    What types of subject do you plan to photograph with a macro lens? Still life, (flowers plants, objects) or living things like insects. That is a big factor on what lens to choose. Also budget of course. If you are shooting butterflies, dragonflies, etc, you should consider the 180mm macro lens, so you have more working distance. It also makes a great, but long, portrait lens. If you are doing studio work, then the 50mm macro is probably fine, but also consider a 50mm f/1.8 and extension tubes.
     
  6. Gem

    Gem TPF Noob!

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    I really like taking photos of flowers, plants, insects, etc., but going to the 180mm would be stretching the budget just a little too far.

    I asked for advice in the local camera shop today (Jessop's), and the guy there said he would go for the 60mm Macro. He said he tried both of them, and found the 60mm worked better for him.

    I think I'm going to give it some time, and think about it a little more before I make the purchase.

    Thanks for all your advice though. :wink:
     
  7. Gem

    Gem TPF Noob!

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    Okay, another dumb question:

    I know that a EF 100-300mm zoom lens, 'works' approx. like a 160-480mm lens(on a DSLR with a focal length multiplier of 1.6).

    How does all this affect a macro lens (I'm looking at the EF 100mm f2.8 Macro USM or Ef-S 60mm f2.8 Macro USM)??
     

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