White Balance on D70S

Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by bellaPictures, Dec 14, 2005.

  1. bellaPictures

    bellaPictures TPF Noob!

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    Hello everyone!

    Just wondering what white balance do you set the camera on when taking indoor photos on a bright sunny day with lots of natural light coming through. I took some photos in my living room with so much light coming through the window but was confused on what WB to set it to. So i set it to shade and the photos became very yellow/orange?? It didnt look right to me.

    Any ideas or suggestions? im still learning alot about the camera at the moment. Thanks in advance
     
  2. Digital Matt

    Digital Matt alter ego: Analog Matt

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    Was it 100% natural lighting, or a mix?

    The best thing you can do is do a custom white balance. The next best thing is set it to auto white balance and shoot in raw, then fine tune it on the computer.
     
  3. bellaPictures

    bellaPictures TPF Noob!

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    Yes it was 100% natural light, im not sure how to do a custom WB but i know how to set it to auto and shoot raw?! hahaha

    Any tips? thanks so much
     
  4. AIRIC

    AIRIC TPF Noob!

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    This is funny as it is the second time in two days I have been asked about the D-70 white balance and what I use. I shoot almost everything on the D-70 with the cloudy white balance. For me it renders the right tones I’m looking for. I use it for cloudy, sunny, flash and bounce flash, even night photos. You can also tweak the white balance by holding the white balance button and turning the front dial (sub command dial) You will see a + or – white balance.

    HTH,

    Eric
     
  5. Digital Matt

    Digital Matt alter ego: Analog Matt

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    I'm a Canon user, so I can't guide you through the entire process, but essentially it should be the same for custom white balancing. Take a shot of a piece of plain white paper, under your lighting conditions. Somewhere in your menu system you should have an option for custom white balance, and it will ask you to select a picture. Pic the one of the white paper. You may also be able to select a color temperature, which you could adjust to suit the lighting by trial and error, since it is digital.
     
  6. JonMikal

    JonMikal TPF Noob!

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    well i'll be...i do the same exact thing!
     
  7. JonMikal

    JonMikal TPF Noob!

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    the d70 has this option.
     
  8. bellaPictures

    bellaPictures TPF Noob!

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    Thanks everyone for your advice. I have been using cloudy WB a majority of the time too but was curious about being indoor with lots of natural light. I have to read more about this i think because i dont know alot about it especially setting the colour temp etc...no idea! Im still pretty new to the whole digital concept. So i will be asking alot more questions about it soon
    thanks for all your help!
     

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