White Balance Practice - C&C

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by kric2schaam626, Aug 3, 2010.

  1. kric2schaam626

    kric2schaam626 TPF Noob!

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    I just took these photos for the sake of visually seeing the difference between each WB setting.

    I change them to such as sunlight and flash, which didn't really pertain, but when I do get the opportunity to take advantage I will do so and probably post some more.

    I played with the shutter speed a tiny bit and up-ed the ISO after a shot.


    1. Auto -3
    [​IMG]

    2. Auto -3
    [​IMG]

    3. Auto +3
    [​IMG]

    4. Auto 0
    [​IMG]

    5. Auto -3
    [​IMG]

    6. Auto +3
    [​IMG]

    7. Fluoresce 0
    [​IMG]

    8. Incandesc -3
    [​IMG]


    So I can visibly see the difference between these. I know that my lighting greatly affects when and how I use the WB, but when do I know to change a setting? What do I look out for?
     
  2. Gdav36

    Gdav36 TPF Noob!

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    You pretty much answered your own question "I know that my lighting greatly affects when and how I use the WB" your WB setting is to tell the camera what the human eye views as white. Different light sources give off different hues/colors of light, although our eyes see the same object as white, your camera sensor needs to be told what to see before it can see the object as we do. I've tried playing with my camera wb presets and I have found that in most cases it comes close, however a lot of the time, "Not Quite There". The colors weren't replicated as i remembered them.. The way I was able to overcome this was by PP and shooting in RAW/NEF format, and using something such as x-rite color checker passport.
     
  3. IgsEMT

    IgsEMT No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    If shooting with flash, then no need to change anything as flash will be your primary color.
    If no flash and going from outdoors to indoors, then play around.

    With flash indoors, I usually shoot at faster shutter speeds (1/125-1/200) to knock out as much ambient light as possible.
     
  4. kric2schaam626

    kric2schaam626 TPF Noob!

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    If I get a blue tint when using flash indoors, is that sign to change white balance or user defect?
     
  5. Flash Harry

    Flash Harry TPF Noob!

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    You shouldn't get a blue tint indoor with flash, incandescent bulbs produce an orangey tint, I think the "blue" your seeing is down to slight underexposure and if in white its a shade of gray. H
     
  6. crimbfighter

    crimbfighter No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    I've noticed the same tint, even indoors when using flash. I think it occurs because there is some other light source that is overpowering your flash and becoming the dominant light source. To see the effect, just set the WB to flash, and don't use the flash. You'll see the same blue tint. This is happening because the flash WB is set to be expecting a specific temperature light (ie the flash) but it's actually seeing something else, a different temperature light (usually incandescent in this case). And if you've told the camera "I am using a flash" The camera replies by saying, "I will apply these color adjustments to the photo because you're telling me there will be flash" The camera applies those colors, but because there was actually no flash, or not enough flash, the color adjustments were wrong, giving you that blue tint. The camera is dumb, it only does what you tell it to do. :lol: The ways I've found to correct this, is increase the flash output to make sure it's the dominant light source. Or, block or modify other light sources to bring your flash back to the dominant light source.

    Just keep in mind, if using flash, with the WB set to flash, the dominant light source needs to be the flash. You could also experiment with custom WB. I've been having a lot of success with that lately. I frequently check my photos on the LCD, and if the colors seem off from what I remember, I do a quick WB reset and I'm good to go. Or also if I know I'm going from say outside sun to indoors. Then just do a quick WB reset.

    Also, as was mentioned above, it doesn't really matter what your WB was if you shoot in RAW, except it makes it a lot easier to adjust the setting on the RAW file when viewing it on your computer. This occurs because your computer program, PS, LR or whatever you use, defaults to the settings it used for the JPEG or TIFF file that it outputs for your camera LCD. So, if your JPEG looks good on the camera, that will be the default starting point for the RAW processing when you bring it up in your computer.

    And as always, if I'm mistaken on any of this, feel free to correct me!

    P.S. Sorry for the long winded word vomit... :puke:
     
    Last edited: Aug 3, 2010
  7. kric2schaam626

    kric2schaam626 TPF Noob!

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    Would anybody agree that pics 3 and 6 look most natural for the given lighting?
     
  8. crimbfighter

    crimbfighter No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Given the choices, I would agree. #8 being a close second.
     
  9. Taylor510ce

    Taylor510ce TPF Noob!

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    Shoot in auto WB and make minor adjustments in post. Or if you need to, shoot a gray card if all shots are going to havethe same set up it can saveyou some time. Even if you get the WB close by guessing...you will many times still have slight color casts that will need to be fixed in post.
     
  10. kric2schaam626

    kric2schaam626 TPF Noob!

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    I've never used a gray card, wouldn't really know what to look out for?
     
  11. Taylor510ce

    Taylor510ce TPF Noob!

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    You can buy one online....you useit to set WB either by using your camer to set that as a neutral gray or using a test shot in post to click as agray point andthen apply to all pics in that series.
     

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