white balance

Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by Yoshi, Jun 3, 2008.

  1. Yoshi

    Yoshi TPF Noob!

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    Hi, I have a few questions on white balance and lens flare. Can someone please help me out.

    -When you are in mixed lighting conditions and you want to have the real colours everywhere, how do you manually white balance then?
    -And where should you place the white paper? I'm talking here about the situations where you can't put CTB or CTO to adjust the colours.

    -Also when a light is much brighter than it is in reality but there are no rays or little circles across the image, is this also called lens flare? And how do you do to not have this? For example, your are filming the sun and it looks much brighter than it is in reality.


    Thanks for your help.

    Yoshi
     
  2. JerryPH

    JerryPH No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    The search function has the answers here for these questions already, feel free to get some nice in depth explanations.

    Here is some additional info about WB for you.

    http://jerryphpics.blogspot.com/2008/03/1-white-balance.html

    As for how to adjust the WB on your camera, feel free to look it up in the manual.


    Lens flare?
    - use a lens hoot
    - don't shoot into the sun.
     
  3. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

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    I think you may be describing blown out highlights. Your camera (all cameras) can only capture a range of tones from dark to light. When the exposure is set to expose for darker areas, anything that is too bright for that range, will appear white and have no detail. We call this a blown out highlight.

    To avoid this, you could set your camera to expose for the highlights...but then any dark areas would loose detail a appear black in the photo.
     
  4. JIP

    JIP No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    You know it is only necesarry to post the same topic once in one section you wil get answers. Also you will get less repeat answers.
     

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