Why Full-Frame?

Discussion in 'Photographic Discussions' started by keith204, Dec 16, 2007.

  1. keith204

    keith204 No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    What are the benefits of Full-Frame sensors?
     
  2. Alex_B

    Alex_B No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    + in principle larger sensors are capable of less noise (given the same number of pixels, and comparing sensors of the same generation)

    + an ultrawide angle is an ultrawide angle

    + at least these days still: larger image in the viewfinder, which makes composition easier, and also manual focussing



    of course there are also advantages of smaller sensors on the other hand ...
     
  3. gryphonslair99

    gryphonslair99 Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    Alex_B is right on all three points but I would add that not only is the image in the viewfinder larger, but usually it is brighter. A real boon when shooting low light stuff.
     
  4. Alex_B

    Alex_B No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    forgot one more ... if you also shoot film, you do not have to adjust your brain to two different media sizes when using the same lenses (as I do).
     
  5. Sw1tchFX

    Sw1tchFX TPF Noob!

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    to get the same angle of view, you need longer lenses, which in turn mean thinner DOF, so if you're doing portraits for example, a 50mm gives a bout the same angle of view on APS-C as an 85mm does on 35mm (50x1.6=80) however an 85mm f/1.4 has much thinner DOF than a 50mm f/1.4, so isolating your subject is much easier.
     
  6. astrostu

    astrostu Guest

    Because I want a 14 mm lens to be a 14 mm lens, not 22.4 mm. :(
     
  7. Alpha

    Alpha Troll Extraordinaire

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    Thinner?

    Does that mean increase or decrease in DOF?
     
  8. Sw1tchFX

    Sw1tchFX TPF Noob!

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    lol, you know what i mean.
     
  9. skieur

    skieur TPF Noob!

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    One disadvantage to larger sensors is larger, more cumbersome telephoto/zoom lenses. If you want to shoot handheld with a telephoto/zoom, then I would choose a smaller sensor with a low noise reputation and a smaller size telephoto for the same range.

    skieur
     
  10. Alpha

    Alpha Troll Extraordinaire

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    No I don't, actually. My intuition tells me that when you say thinner you mean shallower, but longer focal lengths flatten depth perspective, effectively increasing the depth of field.
     
  11. Helen B

    Helen B TPF Noob!

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    I guess that Sw1tchFX is referring to two pictures taken from the same place, one with an APS-C sized sensor and one full frame. To get the same picture angle a longer lens is used on the full frame picture. Therefore the perspective and angle of view is identical in each picture.

    The focal length of the lens does not affect perspective - only the lens location affects perspective, and perspective compression or expansion depends on the relationship between the taking angle and the 'print' viewing angle.

    At the same aperture and for the same viewing conditions (ie both images viewed at the same size) the picture taken with the longer focal length will have less depth of field than the one taken with the shorter focal length. This is sometimes an advantage and sometimes a disadvantage. This effect is very obvious to photographers who use 35 mm and large format - in those cases the difference in depth of field is dramatic.

    Best,
    Helen
     
  12. DSLR noob

    DSLR noob TPF Noob!

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    Another reason is to brag about having full frame. Taking the lens off to see that huge 35mm mirror is a good feeling (I have to do it on my film camera though, I don't have a FF DSLR) and the viewfinder is amazing. I know somehting like that is no reason for an investment, but it really does feel so good.
     

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