Will this work for a studio on the cheap?

Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by LAW2, Nov 2, 2006.

  1. LAW2

    LAW2 TPF Noob!

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    As you can see from my signature my equipment list is short and unsophisticated. I recently bought the Beast for tight portraiture work of my young children. Because of this purchase I am tapped out for the rest of the year. I would like to set up a temporary studio for holiday pictures but I have some questions. I was gifted, thanks dad, some old backdrops, 2 light stands, 2 lamp lights (these are the kind that use a regular light bulb and they have a 8 inch reflector), one large soft box, and about five flash slaves (the kind that screw into a 110 lamp socket).
    My questions are:
    Will the small screw in slaves provide enough light?
    What if one of them is in the soft box?
    Would I be better off putting my SB600 in the soft box and triggering it with a cord?
    Do I really need a light meter?

    I have a vision of what I want to do. I’m just not sure my equipment is capable. If there is something I missed or you would like more info please let me know. I appreciate you taking the time to read and respond.
     
  2. jacull

    jacull TPF Noob!

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    The best thing to do is experiment with what you have. The great thing about digital is that you can see your results instantly and learn instantly. Try different things: it will teach you much more than anything we can tell you.
     
  3. Illah

    Illah TPF Noob!

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    Since portraiture typically uses shallow depth of field through use of low f-stops, a happy side effect is the ability to use much less light and still get proper exposure. You'll probably be pleasantly surprised how little light you really need.

    Also since portraiture is typically relatively tight on the subject, you can position those lamps like 3' away from them for much more intensity. A 100W bulb can be dim from 15' but painfully bright when right in your face. Just keep them right out of the frame rather than keeping them way back.

    --Illah
     
  4. W.Smith

    W.Smith TPF Noob!

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    That, obviously, depends on their power output, LAW.
    Can you tell us what it is?
    Maybe yes, maybe no, LAW. Also depends on their power output, of course.
    No. Your cam probably has spot metering. And we're in the 21st century, photography is digital now, so you can do test shots and see ('chimp') the effects of the light(s).
     
  5. W.Smith

    W.Smith TPF Noob!

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    That, obviously, depends on their power output, LAW.
    Can you tell us what it is?
    Maybe yes, maybe no, LAW. Also depends on their power output, of course.
    No. Your cam probably has spot metering. And we're in the 21st century, photography is digital now, so you can do test shots and see ('chimp') the effects of the light(s).
     
  6. mysteryscribe

    mysteryscribe TPF Noob!

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    I vote experiment. Set them up the way you get the best results on your child's teddy bear. Figure the best aperture then don't move the lights till you are through with your Christmas pics.

    The large flash on your soft box will work fine. The open screw in strobes might even match up pretty close to control. To adjust them just move them closer or farther away. The exposure is figured light to subject, not camera to subject so you should be cool.

    Since you are working digital, you could also just buy some big old light bulbs and set them up as well. You can change the color balance in the camera you know. Why not grab a box of 100 to 200 watt bulbs at four for a dollar at walmart and try them as well. Just a thought, not much whiz bang but some of us still use them on black and white.

    Your camera will be your best light meter. shoot at differnt setting with the teddy holding different thngs for each. Pick the one you can do the most with and use it.

    Not sure this will help but good luck
     

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