Working in the dark

Discussion in 'The Darkroom' started by D_Waldo, May 25, 2016.

  1. D_Waldo

    D_Waldo TPF Noob!

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    I'm brand spanking new to darkroom work. I have acquired the requisite chemicals.
    I have Ilford Multigrade paper developer (liquid)
    Kodak professional stop bath (liquid)
    and
    Kodak professional fixer (powder)
    I have some basic questions:
    1. Does the mixing of the chemicals need to be done in the dark?
    2. For the developer the container says "to make 5 liters (1+9)". Does that mean 1 part liquid from the bottle to 9 parts water?
    3. My tap water is relatively high in iron content. Will that affect developing?
    Thank you in advance for the help.


     
  2. Designer

    Designer Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    1. Check the directions on the bottle, but I don't think chemicals are light sensitive.
    2. yes
    3. Use distilled water

    Taking paper out of the package requires some preparation and understanding the procedure before you start. Usually the paper will be packaged a certain way, meaning emulsion side oriented toward one side of the package. Use dry hands, pull out one sheet, and close the package.

    Expose your print emulsion side up (toward the enlarger light) and begin the developing process soon after the exposure. (if you want to expose several prints in close succession, protect all sheets from light until you are ready to begin the developing process.) Usually one at a time is much safer to keep from fogging the other sheets.
     
    Last edited: May 25, 2016
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  3. vintagesnaps

    vintagesnaps Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    Try Film Photography Project | An Internet Radio Show & On-Line Resource for Film Shooters Worldwide, thy have a Flickr group and a message board where you could ask questions.

    Or try Kodak and Ilford's websites, I know Ilford has some resources on theirs, and Kodak fact sheets show up in searches for various types of chemistry, etc.

    Maybe look up the Eastman House, although their resources may be more about historic photography. The last thing I saw was a video clip recorded on B&W movie film made there of an instructor riding in a Model T (look up Mark Osterman if you want to see it).
     
    Last edited: May 25, 2016
  4. D_Waldo

    D_Waldo TPF Noob!

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    This is great; Exactly what I needed. Thank you to all!
     
  5. 480sparky

    480sparky Chief Free Electron Relocator Supporting Member

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    Only film and paper (the stuff with 'emulsions') are light sensitive.
     
  6. gsgary

    gsgary Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    No, chemicals don't need to be mixed in the dark

    Yes that is how you mix it

    Tap water has always been ok for me just fit a filter to your tap when mixing and washing

    Sent from my SM-G903F using Tapatalk
     
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