Zephyr

Discussion in 'Landscape & Cityscape' started by abraxas, Nov 8, 2008.

  1. abraxas

    abraxas No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    [​IMG]
     
  2. kundalini

    kundalini Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    Timing is everything........ well, at times like these anyway.
     
  3. PatrickHMS

    PatrickHMS TPF Noob!

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    Timing...

    And location, location, location.
     
  4. a_spaceman

    a_spaceman TPF Noob!

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    and colour i must add. i love the colour of the grass in the foreground and how its warmth clashes with the background.
     
  5. anubis404

    anubis404 TPF Noob!

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    Great shot!
     
  6. abraxas

    abraxas No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Yeah, sadly enough. That was a good day. Sitting here the last two days watching the weather go by- moping.

    That too. This was 110 miles from my house.

    I tried processing the lower half separate from the top. I'm pretty happy with the look. Wish I had some stuff that I could put on the camera to do it right in the box. Need more stuff. Need to get out of the house more often. It's been a week.

    Thank you.

    & Thanks everyone, I appreciate your comments!
     
  7. willard3

    willard3 TPF Noob!

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    I like it.

    We call them wind devils.
     
  8. abraxas

    abraxas No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Thanks. Typically they're called "dust devils" around here. I like the word "zephyr" though, and this one never turned into the tall, narrow and winding, tornado-shape they usually go to.
     
  9. misia

    misia TPF Noob!

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    Nice shot. It looks lie small tornado.
     
  10. Yemme

    Yemme No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Well Well Well if it isn't Mr.KingOfTheJungle living on the edge. Great shot, love the colors.
     
  11. Fox Paw

    Fox Paw TPF Noob!

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    Very nice. Even though I'd call it a dust devil....
     
  12. abraxas

    abraxas No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Thanks.

    They do tend to look like that. I've seen them go as high as 100-200 feet, usually over dry lakes and during very hot and dry times of the year. Their origin is much different than a tornado though.

    Here's something that may be of interest;

    "A dustdevil is a whirlwind into which dust and debris gets caught up, making it visible. Dust devils form through a different mechanism than tornadoes, and are much smaller, usually only 10 to 50 feet in diameter, and usually not extending more than 100 feet into the air. They usually are seen in relatively dry conditions, when sunlight is providing strong heating of the surface, and when winds are generally light. The heated land surface can start to produce convective rolls of air (as in the diagram above). Some of these rolls can get tilted upright, producing a dust devil. "

    Source - http://www.weatherquestions.com/What_are_dust_devils.htm

    I'm not sure about the intention in your reference, so I'll just say 'thanks' on the rest of it.
     

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