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Old Stuff

Alpha

Troll Extraordinaire
Joined
Mar 15, 2005
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Can others edit my Photos
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Okay, so the photos aren't old. But the film is. Kodak EPY (64T) expired in 1980. Shot at EI50 and cross-processed. This is not a diptych, btw. And they're a bit soft because of the damned flatbed scanner. And if you'd like to be added to my ignore list, just try calling me on the rule of thirds.


c1.jpg



c2.jpg


Edit. Or if you prefer:
c_contact.jpg

 
I would never call you on a rule Max. Seldom use 'em myself. :) Amazing quality for 25 Y.O. expired film. Was the BG a neutral gray? The skin tone looks good, just the BG looks a little cold.
 
I would never call you on a rule Max. Seldom use 'em myself. :) Amazing quality for 25 Y.O. expired film. Was the BG a neutral gray? The skin tone looks good, just the BG looks a little cold.

The BG is actually a little warm in real life...it's unbleached canvas. The color shifts in general are undoubtedly due to the use of tungsten film without a daylight-balancing filter, and then cross-processing. I'm not entirely sure why it's more pronounced in the second one. I guess that's just the nature of the beast.
 
The vignetting is due to the lens. It's an 80mm Rodenstock Heligon from a Graflex XL (6x9) mounted onto a recessed board for my 4x5 monorail. It doesn't quite cover 4x5.
 
I can feel her lips.
 
I find that an obvious backdrop distracts the viewer and creates a contrived, artificial, and deliberately posed look to the image. I would shoot outside with a fast lens and use depth of field to blur out a dark or light background to give more of a romantic, natural, feel to the image.

skieur
 
I doubt there will ever be anything natural looking about expired and cross-processed tungsten film shot at daylight temperatures. The lens is extraordinarily fast: f2.8 on 4x5.

This isn't your ordinary portrait session. They're friends who came over to my room, had a couple glasses of wine, and enjoyed themselves in front of the camera while I tested this film for the first time. I think you have my intentions confused. I was well aware of the backdrop being obvious. As you can see from my many comments to others on the board who I criticize for placing their subjects too close to the backdrop, I'm no stranger to that technical issue. I also beg to differ that shooting outdoors and opting for a bokeh background gives any less of a contrived or artificial look. Expressions of affection have no "natural" setting. They're natural anywhere and everywhere.
 

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