Post Production

Discussion in 'Film Discussion and Q & A' started by sarahkate, Feb 15, 2012.

  1. sarahkate

    sarahkate TPF Noob!

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    Hi everyone! I'm still shooting digital while I further my knowledge of film photographybefore I make the switch. I just have a few questions regarding the post process.

    If you send your film to a lab how do you get your images back? CD/DVD, proof sheet, negatives, etc?

    After I get my images back from the lab and I decide I want one enlarged or as a digital scan do I send the lab the negative?

    Also, I plan on shooting just for personal use and family...how do you store your negatives and or proofs after you get them back from the lab?

    Should I look into processing equipment, if so what exactly do you recommend?


    Please forgive me if my questions aren't clear or don't make sense. So far all my learning has been internet based and I haven't found much regarding processing other than doing it yourself. Maybe I just need to pick up a book or call a print lab. :) I'm open to all recommendations!Nonetheless what are your steps?


    Thanks in advance.


     
  2. ann

    ann No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    1, Depends on which lab and what you wish. You can tell them to put the images on a cd, or not print the negatives.

    2. You need to take the negative into the lab to get an enlargement

    3. Get a pack of Print file archival pages and put the negatives in those. THey can be placed in a three ring binder. Do not cut them so you have only one left. Handling one 35mm negative is a pain.

    Processing your own negatives is very easy and much cheaper than a lab. However, it may depend on how many rolls of film your going to be taking.

    Check out Ilford's website , they have a series of pdf articles that will give you a list of things needed. Other than that, you load the film into the tank in the dark and then everything else is done under normal lighting conditions. THen you can scan , etc.

    If you want to learn how to print from those negatives, then that is a whole knew learning curve and takes time and lots of practice.
     
  3. sarahkate

    sarahkate TPF Noob!

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    Thanks for your reply.

    I've heard great things about Richards Photo Lab so I assume I'll use them. Regarding the negatives, is there away to see them larger or some type of device to view them larger in order to see detail? Right now I think I'll just stick with taking pictures and leave everything else up to the lab...I'm still learning :)
     
  4. molested_cow

    molested_cow TPF Supporters Supporting Member

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    Negative storage:
    I use negative sleeves that are letter size for three-ring binders. You may need a humidity controlled storage depending on your local climate. I also use lint-free gloves when handling the negatives. Finger prints are nasty.

    Scan:
    Common labs like walmart, walgreens etc can give your scans on a CD. However the resolution tend to be inadequate. I personally has my own scanner. Epson V700. It's a flat bed scanner with film holders for various formats. Therefore when I sent my negatives to the lab, I only ask for processing. I do my own scanning (high res) and pick and choose which to edit and print. Scanning and cleaning the photos up is very time consuming. If you have nothing better to do after work like I was, it's a good time-killer.

    If you want to do the dark room thing... that's a whole other story.
     
  5. ann

    ann No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    You could use a loupe to view the negatives on a light table. Or have the lab make you a contact sheet on an 11x14 piece of paper.
     
  6. sarahkate

    sarahkate TPF Noob!

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    Thanks for the replies!

    Say I have just my negatives developed at 'the average' lab, would they be any different than having them developed at...Richards Photo Lab? Their prices are a little more than the average lab, so I was thinking in order to cut down cost I could just have my negatives developed at a local lab. And when I want something enlarged and custom printed I could send the negative off to Richards. Would the negative be the same at any lab?
     
  7. molested_cow

    molested_cow TPF Supporters Supporting Member

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    To me, as long as they follow the procedures, it should be the same. However, guys at "average lab" are not nearly as sensitive and well-trained as those who are hired at pro labs. I've had my negatives over exposed cus they were not careful when extracting the leading end of the film from the canister. When I went to retrieve the negatives, I always ask them NOT to cut it cus I want to do it myself according to my scanner's format. Sometimes the not-so-smart one will just roll the whole strip up and stuff the whole thing in an envelop, giving me heart attack when I see it.

    I've never gotten bad processing cus they just run the strips through a machine. As long as the machine doesn't screw up, it's fine. It's always the human handling the films that matters more.
     

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