Suprisingly not terrible (night shot)

Kjar

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Last night I decided to try out my 45mm f/1.8 prime for my Oly omd mk2. The resulting image suprised me in the crispness of the shot.
OI000276.jpg

ISO 1600, 1/3 Shutter speed, 1.8 aperature

Slower shutter of 1"
OI000277.jpg

How do I improve from here?
I wasn't using a tripod, so that's the obvious first step.
 

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How to improve?

Get a photo of a real UFO.
 
How do I improve from here?
I wasn't using a tripod, so that's the obvious first step.

yes, the first or second step --- something other than "dots in the sky"
or that evidence of a "real UFO"
 
How do I improve from here?
I wasn't using a tripod, so that's the obvious first step.

yes, the first or second step --- something other than "dots in the sky"
or that evidence of a "real UFO"
Were you expecting to be surprised at tiny dots in the sky?

How to improve?

Get a photo of a real UFO.

You guys don't have to be jerks about it! They asking how to improve, and your comments are worthless!!!:madass:


I know nothing about taking star photos, so I can't help you. Sorry :(
Some one else around here should be able to help you. :)
 
Tripod and live composite is what my buddy just told me. I have no idea what he is saying as he is making fun of my tiny Canon S90 while drinking all my Stella at 11:20 eastern time. He uses Olympus stuff and is a moocher. However, he gets paid to take pictures, obviously not enough according to the wife... She hates the pretty boy....lol

Oh, he said your pics are cool and your on the right track... Now he has exited the man cave to flirt with my wife as his Olympus trip 35 film dries... What a tool

Sent from my XT1254 using Tapatalk
 
First off, Welcome to TPF.

Grab a tripod and then you will be open to a lot more. Try doing some longer exposures and see what you come up with. If the moon is out you can also take pics of objects you normally do during the day and use the moon to illuminate it. You may be able to get some more stars in the photo with a slightly longer exposure. If you go too long you will start to see star trails where they are moving. Of course those are cool to do too and stack the photo's together to get a photo that looks like it was done over a few hours but without the noise of running the camera that long.
 
First off, Welcome to TPF.

Grab a tripod and then you will be open to a lot more. Try doing some longer exposures and see what you come up with. If the moon is out you can also take pics of objects you normally do during the day and use the moon to illuminate it. You may be able to get some more stars in the photo with a slightly longer exposure. If you go too long you will start to see star trails where they are moving. Of course those are cool to do too and stack the photo's together to get a photo that looks like it was done over a few hours but without the noise of running the camera that long.
So that's how they reduce the noise... pretty simple. If one were to stack images, would a higher ISO be needed?
 
First off, Welcome to TPF.

Grab a tripod and then you will be open to a lot more. Try doing some longer exposures and see what you come up with. If the moon is out you can also take pics of objects you normally do during the day and use the moon to illuminate it. You may be able to get some more stars in the photo with a slightly longer exposure. If you go too long you will start to see star trails where they are moving. Of course those are cool to do too and stack the photo's together to get a photo that looks like it was done over a few hours but without the noise of running the camera that long.
So that's how they reduce the noise... pretty simple. If one were to stack images, would a higher ISO be needed?

Just depends on the camera. I have to run the ISO on my crop frame camera higher than I do on my full frame. If you're not getting a lot of noise at 1600 I'd try that to start with for shorter exposures or you can lower it some and see if you're getting a good exposure still. I haven't messed with a Olympus omd enough to know how they act with ISO. Like was said above if you can get away from any city lights you'll be able to get more stars in your photo. What you want is a properly exposed frame for stacking. It isn't any different that taking a single shot you're just taking a bunch of them then adding them all together to make one photo.
 
First off, Welcome to TPF.

Grab a tripod and then you will be open to a lot more. Try doing some longer exposures and see what you come up with. If the moon is out you can also take pics of objects you normally do during the day and use the moon to illuminate it. You may be able to get some more stars in the photo with a slightly longer exposure. If you go too long you will start to see star trails where they are moving. Of course those are cool to do too and stack the photo's together to get a photo that looks like it was done over a few hours but without the noise of running the camera that long.
So that's how they reduce the noise... pretty simple. If one were to stack images, would a higher ISO be needed?

Just depends on the camera. I have to run the ISO on my crop frame camera higher than I do on my full frame. If you're not getting a lot of noise at 1600 I'd try that to start with for shorter exposures or you can lower it some and see if you're getting a good exposure still. I haven't messed with a Olympus omd enough to know how they act with ISO. Like was said above if you can get away from any city lights you'll be able to get more stars in your photo. What you want is a properly exposed frame for stacking. It isn't any different that taking a single shot you're just taking a bunch of them then adding them all together to make one photo.
Thanks for dropping in again. I was envisioning stacking noise. If even a little too high of an ISO I would think that after a couple stills stacked that it would become obvious. Then again, I've never tried it and I'm just throwing things out there.
 
First off, Welcome to TPF.

Grab a tripod and then you will be open to a lot more. Try doing some longer exposures and see what you come up with. If the moon is out you can also take pics of objects you normally do during the day and use the moon to illuminate it. You may be able to get some more stars in the photo with a slightly longer exposure. If you go too long you will start to see star trails where they are moving. Of course those are cool to do too and stack the photo's together to get a photo that looks like it was done over a few hours but without the noise of running the camera that long.
So that's how they reduce the noise... pretty simple. If one were to stack images, would a higher ISO be needed?

Just depends on the camera. I have to run the ISO on my crop frame camera higher than I do on my full frame. If you're not getting a lot of noise at 1600 I'd try that to start with for shorter exposures or you can lower it some and see if you're getting a good exposure still. I haven't messed with a Olympus omd enough to know how they act with ISO. Like was said above if you can get away from any city lights you'll be able to get more stars in your photo. What you want is a properly exposed frame for stacking. It isn't any different that taking a single shot you're just taking a bunch of them then adding them all together to make one photo.
Thanks for dropping in again. I was envisioning stacking noise. If even a little too high of an ISO I would think that after a couple stills stacked that it would become obvious. Then again, I've never tried it and I'm just throwing things out there.


Easiest way is to try it and see if you like what you come up with. If not try again with different settings. You can get a stacking program free off the net. I can't remember the website but the company offers it for free.
 
First off, Welcome to TPF.

Grab a tripod and then you will be open to a lot more. Try doing some longer exposures and see what you come up with. If the moon is out you can also take pics of objects you normally do during the day and use the moon to illuminate it. You may be able to get some more stars in the photo with a slightly longer exposure. If you go too long you will start to see star trails where they are moving. Of course those are cool to do too and stack the photo's together to get a photo that looks like it was done over a few hours but without the noise of running the camera that long.
So that's how they reduce the noise... pretty simple. If one were to stack images, would a higher ISO be needed?

Just depends on the camera. I have to run the ISO on my crop frame camera higher than I do on my full frame. If you're not getting a lot of noise at 1600 I'd try that to start with for shorter exposures or you can lower it some and see if you're getting a good exposure still. I haven't messed with a Olympus omd enough to know how they act with ISO. Like was said above if you can get away from any city lights you'll be able to get more stars in your photo. What you want is a properly exposed frame for stacking. It isn't any different that taking a single shot you're just taking a bunch of them then adding them all together to make one photo.
Thanks for dropping in again. I was envisioning stacking noise. If even a little too high of an ISO I would think that after a couple stills stacked that it would become obvious. Then again, I've never tried it and I'm just throwing things out there.


Easiest way is to try it and see if you like what you come up with. If not try again with different settings. You can get a stacking program free off the net. I can't remember the website but the company offers it for free.
I will definently try it! That is, however, when my computer comes in. Stupid backorder. Everything so far has been straight of the camera and onto my phone, ugh!
 
How do I improve from here?
I wasn't using a tripod, so that's the obvious first step.

yes, the first or second step --- something other than "dots in the sky"
or that evidence of a "real UFO"
Were you expecting to be surprised at tiny dots in the sky?

How to improve?

Get a photo of a real UFO.

You guys don't have to be jerks about it! They asking how to improve, and your comments are worthless!!!:madass:


I know nothing about taking star photos, so I can't help you. Sorry :(
Some one else around here should be able to help you. :)

Not only answers can be worthless sometimes (and manytimes) questions can be worthless. With all respect to the OP I don't try to offend you or anyone else but... Even if one is a uterly new to photography one has to know what results one would like to achieve and in this case obvious that OP posts the pictures that far from results he has wanted to get. Or dots in the black sky was the goal? Composition, tripod, background, light polution, camera setting and more and more. I think all this should have to be considered before taking that pictures I know that the internet is full of tutorials about astrography. Did OP watch or read them? Did OP see good astro pictures (works of jsecordphoto or Majeed Badizadegan for example) wich could be found easily? I'm sure that OP had to prepare berofe taking or posting such just "technical" pictures.
For example one posts a portrait taken with wide-angle lens with 100k ISO, f22, on-camera flash and a dump as background and then asks how to improve the photo to put it in a PlayBoy cover.

Now can push 'Disagree' =)
 
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