The moon

Discussion in 'General Gallery' started by xDarek, Jan 22, 2016.

  1. xDarek

    xDarek No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    First time when I'm shooting the moon.What do you think?


     

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  2. astroNikon

    astroNikon 'ya all Bananas I tell 'ya Supporting Member

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    You can open up your aperture from f/19 as it's pretty far away so DOF shouldn't be an issue
    Also increase your shutter speed from 1/32
    but not bad first shot.
     
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  3. KmH

    KmH In memoriam Supporting Member

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    The first shot of the 3 is the best.
    The last photo (or crop) of just the moon is too out of focus to be pleasing to look at.

    Yep, point of focus (PoF) distance is just one of several considerations for depth of field (DoF).
    Understanding Depth of Field in Photography
    The moon is 250,000 miles away, effectively making the PoF distance infinity.

    Metering the moon is a pain because the mare (sea) are so much darker than the rest of the surface.
    Focusing on the moon is difficult because we have to contend with the entire depth of earth's moving atmosphere.
     
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  4. TCampbell

    TCampbell Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    Considering it's your first time... not too shabby! Your third shot is out of focus. I can't see the exposure info (I'm on my iPad and don't have an EXIF plug-in) but Steve says you're shooting at f/19.

    The moon is bright enough that you can use a fairly fast shutter speed. At f/11 the correct shutter speed is the inverse of the ISO (e.g. At ISO 100 use 1/100th. At ISO 400 use 1/400th, etc.). But if you open that up by, say, 2 stops and shoot at f/5.6 then at ISO 100 you can use 1/400th and at ISO 400 you could shoot at 1/1600th.

    If you shoot nearer to a 1st quarter or 3rd quarter you get lots of shadow detail on the craters and the moon will look more 3D (less flat) since the Sun is lighting it from the side.
     
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  5. xDarek

    xDarek No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Yea, now I saw the lat pic is blured, I
     
  6. xDarek

    xDarek No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Yea, now I saw the last pic is blured, I will do what you said, thank you for your feedback, you guys are the best:D
     
  7. TCampbell

    TCampbell Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    BTW, I should add... I DO like that you shot this a day or so before the official "full" moon.

    By definition, we get a "full" moon when the moon is exactly opposite the direction of the Sun. But that means that the Moon literally is rising as the Sun is setting. Often there is more haze on the horizon so we have to wait a bit for the moon to get high enough to photograph. But by time that happens, the sky is completely black. So you end up with an image which usually just contains the moon (unless you have an interesting cityscape skyline below). The moon isn't as interesting when it's full because it just looks like a flat 2D disk (it lacks dimensionality or texture).

    But if you shoot a day (or two) before the official "full" moon, the sky is still dusky blue and this means you can expose for some foreground landscape with the moon in the background and this makes for more interesting photography -- especially since you'd need roughly a 1000mm lens if you wanted the moon to mostly "fill the frame" (I use a telescope). Also by definition the Sun will not have quite set and that means you would have the very low and golden sun at your back helping to light the landscape foreground while you get the shot. Get your foreground objects farther from the camera (so distance-wise they're more like "background" objects) and this will help bring everything into the depth of field.

    One more tip... since the Moon (and everything else) always rises in the East, if you can find an interesting landscape or cityscape that you think would make for an interesting shot with a Moonrise in it, you can use "the Photographer's Ephemeris" to calculate exactly where you need to stand at a specific time to get the moon exactly where you want it in the frame. Here's the link: A shot planned with TPE They also make a mobile app (actually I think they have a few of them) if you own a smart device (phone, tablet, etc.) to make it easier to look all this up while out in the field.

    The illusion of the giant moon is created by photographing otherwise "large" objects (things our human brains know are actually big objects) ... but from a great distance away so those objects appear "small" -- and then using a very long focal length lens. The moon is a little less than 400,000km away... so you moving back a few hundred meters hardly makes any difference at all in the size of the Moon... but it makes quite a big difference in the size of your foreground objects. Obviously it helps to do this on a day when the air is especially clear (very low humidity, etc. so as to avoid a hazy look.) There are only a couple of days per month when the moon appears nearly full, low on the horizon, just before sunset... and on those days it needs to ALSO be clear. If that doesn't happen, you have to wait until the next month, and so on... getting that perfect Moonrise shot can be tricky because the total number of opportunities per year is limited and the weather has to cooperate on those days.
     
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  8. xDarek

    xDarek No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Ok, Thank you for taking your time to explain it to me

    Sent from my SM-G386F using Tapatalk
     
  9. Peeb

    Peeb Semi-automatic Mediocrity Generator Supporting Member

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    Thanks, Tim! Good stuff you posted.:trink39:
     

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