Wedding Portraits with the 135 ART

Discussion in 'People Photography' started by Destin, Feb 1, 2018.

  1. Destin

    Destin Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    Sharing these partially because I think they're decent shots, and also to continue my mini series on what I think of the Sigma 135 ART. I was a shooting a wedding and had hoped to use it for the majority of the day on one body, but the layout of the venue didn't lend itself to a prime lens.

    I still pulled it out for some of portraits though, because I knew it would perform well there. All shot on the D810. Settings listed with the shots. First time shooting a wedding in the winter, and really like the falling snow in the portraits.

    I'm really, really starting to enjoy this lens for portrait work. It's becoming my go to. I'm using it to shoot portraits in the snow with a local TF model this weekend, so I'll share those as well when it happens.

    @Derrel, figured you'd like to see this.

    1.) iso 90, f/1.8, 1/2000. They requested this pose and I thought it was cute. Pretty heavily cropped in because of where I had to stand, so the DOF would have been even thinner if I this is how I had framed it in camera.
    [​IMG]

    2.) iso 100, f/1.8, 1/200. Again, slightly cropped in so I was farther than it looks from them, otherwise the DOF would have been even thinner.
    [​IMG]

    3.) iso 125, f/4, 1/400th. Virtually no crop here.
    [​IMG]


     
    Last edited: Feb 1, 2018
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  2. SquarePeg

    SquarePeg hear me roar Staff Member Supporting Member

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    That lens has pretty results. I like your framing in these except for that butt ugly railing! What a bummer.
     
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  3. Destin

    Destin Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    Yeah, I was trying to use the railing as a leading line of sorts. Not sure how well it worked :/
     
  4. jcdeboever

    jcdeboever TPF Supporters Supporting Member

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    Has good subject separation. Is it me or does it look sterile? Maybe I've been shooting to much film.
     
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  5. smoke665

    smoke665 TPF Supporters Supporting Member

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    Nice, though as others have mentioned that railing us terrible. Between the rust and the missing finals, it's a real distraction.

    I like the first one more because of the OOF building.
     
  6. Destin

    Destin Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    Yeah, the railing is starting to piss me off the more I look at it.

    I have other shots where it’s not in frame or is less noticeable. But I haven’t edited them yet.
     
  7. smoke665

    smoke665 TPF Supporters Supporting Member

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    Just a thought but have you experimented with more of a head and shoulders shot? You gave some great color there with that orange bouquet especially. That would also make the snow more visable.
     
  8. Destin

    Destin Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    I have. I like it a lot. But I’m on my phone and can’t post it easily right now. I’ll share later.
     
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  9. SquarePeg

    SquarePeg hear me roar Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Very quick edit to remove the railing in photo #1, needs work but you could take some time to do it right. The other photos might be more complicated.

    26E2FE8D-B50C-4B00-9F1F-3B938F2082C8.jpeg
     
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  10. jcdeboever

    jcdeboever TPF Supporters Supporting Member

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    Wow, what a wonderful improvement! I am not bothered so much by the coldness now. Super PEg!
     
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  11. Destin

    Destin Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    Aright, here are a few that don't include the railing from this shoot. The first two were shot with the 135, and cropped in to remove the railing. The ability to make huge crops on the D810 files is super helpful in cases like this:

    1.) taken at f/4
    [​IMG]

    2.) taken at f/1.8. And this is a very heavy crop (taken from #2 above, which was already cropped)... really shows the detail captured by this camera/lens combination.
    [​IMG]

    3.) While this one includes the railing, it isn't a focal point and doesn't really bother me.
    [​IMG]

    4.) This one was actually taken with the 24-70 G2, but it really shows off their personalities to me (he was picking her up constantly), and I love the blowing snow so I figured I'd share it. Wish I hadn't cut off the top of the arch, but that's the kind of small thing that I struggle to catch in the moment.
    [​IMG]
     
  12. Derrel

    Derrel Mr. Rain Cloud

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    What I like about a 135mm f/2 lens (I've owned three different ones since the mid-1980's) is that is has a very rapid transition from the focused zone into the defocused zone at normal "people picture" distances on a 24x36mm capture size; used on APS-C, the smaller field of view tends to push you wayyyyyyyyyyyy far away, and so there's less of that IN-focus/OUT-of-focus transition when used on a crop-sensor body.

    The thing is, when shooting on a full-frame camera (24x36mm image capture size), the 135mm lens has shallow depth of field AND it also literally "magnifies" the size of the background items, compared against a shorter lens like a 70mm zoom top end, or an 85mm prime, or a 105mm prime; the 135mm length has what I call a "lensy" look to its photos. For many people who've never shot a high-quality 135mm "speed lens" like the 135/2 Ai-S Nikkor, or the 135mm Defocus Control Nikkor, or Canon's nifty 135/2-L USM, they cannot seem to grasp the rationale behind this specific prime lens length; similarly, this is NOT a good lens to use on a crop-sendor camera for people work....the lens is NOT the same on a crop-body...

    I dunno...this lens is VERY well-corrected for chromatic aberration; it's better than the older 135 DC Nikkor as far as CA goes; some people, OTOH, like a little bit of that CA on wide-open shots...but this new Siggy is very,very "clean" in the way it images a scene.

    This lens is a modern optical marvel; not a miracle, but certainly a marvel.
     
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