What processing does this guy use?

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by Dmitri, Mar 28, 2020.

  1. Dmitri

    Dmitri No longer a newbie, moving up!

    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2008
    Messages:
    5,882
    Likes Received:
    40
    Location:
    End of the line
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    • Like Like x 1
  2. tirediron

    tirediron Watch the Birdy! Staff Member Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Jul 8, 2005
    Messages:
    45,748
    Likes Received:
    14,781
    Location:
    Victoria, BC
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    Mostly by getting his lighting right. I don't see anything special in the "processing", but he/she clearly knows his way around a strobe.
     
    • Agree Agree x 3
  3. Ysarex

    Ysarex Been spending a lot of time on here!

    Joined:
    Nov 27, 2011
    Messages:
    6,590
    Likes Received:
    3,109
    Location:
    St. Louis
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    • Funny Funny x 1
  4. Dmitri

    Dmitri No longer a newbie, moving up!

    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2008
    Messages:
    5,882
    Likes Received:
    40
    Location:
    End of the line
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    Really? Many of them seem almost surreal to me, as if half-photo and half-painting for example this one: Alexander Vinogradov on Instagram: “Друзья, напоминаю, что на мой видеоурок по быстрой и естественной ретуши до конца месяца действует скидка 1500 рублей! Все мои фишки в…”

    If that's all lighting, I have a long way to go. Thank you.
     
  5. tirediron

    tirediron Watch the Birdy! Staff Member Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Jul 8, 2005
    Messages:
    45,748
    Likes Received:
    14,781
    Location:
    Victoria, BC
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    Clearly he does some work on skin, etc, but nothing excessive. He's using a good lens and a large modifier; it's very hard to say with these small Instagram images, but I'd guess maybe a 3x4, and placing it very close to the model. I'd guess in most cases the key light is just out of frame.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
    • Useful Useful x 1
  6. tirediron

    tirediron Watch the Birdy! Staff Member Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Jul 8, 2005
    Messages:
    45,748
    Likes Received:
    14,781
    Location:
    Victoria, BC
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    • Like Like x 1
  7. Derrel

    Derrel Mr. Rain Cloud

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2009
    Messages:
    48,229
    Likes Received:
    18,867
    Location:
    USA
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    Buy a big softbox...36" x 48" or bigger... looking at several of his photos, it looks like he makes frequent use of a large scrim or panel,perhaps one as long as 72 inches.... when placed close to a subject a light source that is this big in relation to a single figure it creates a very soft shadow transition. This looks to me like 95% lighting and about 5% processing.

    I would suggest that he is using lighting equipment of a type that you have never used before and which likely do not own or have access to.
     
    Last edited: Mar 28, 2020
    • Useful Useful x 2
  8. Derrel

    Derrel Mr. Rain Cloud

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2009
    Messages:
    48,229
    Likes Received:
    18,867
    Location:
    USA
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    20200328_124352.jpg
    This is from a portrait of a girl who looks to be about 10 years old... this is an extreme crop but it shows what a panel which is also called a scrim, looks like. You can see a central hotspot, and at the periphery you can see a slight fall off in the light. the most well-made systems are called "Scrim Jim" and "California Sunbounce", but there are other lower-priced alternatives including made in China and do it yourself. This type of lighting is very adaptable, and you can vary the distance of the strobe to scrim to control the softness, and you can also add additional Fabrics to make the light softer. This is an old type of lighting which goes back to the 1940s, and which was resurrected in the 1980s, and has now fallen out of favor as inexpensive made in China Light modifiers have made it possible to get big modifiers at fairly low prices. if you like this soft type of lighting and want a quick look at what a truly large modifier does for portraiture you could buy a made-in-china 72 inchumbrella for around $65 and have at least a glimpse into what a big modifier does.
     
    • Useful Useful x 1
  9. Designer

    Designer Been spending a lot of time on here!

    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2012
    Messages:
    18,491
    Likes Received:
    4,823
    Location:
    Iowa
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    The first thing I noticed was that his key light was positioned fairly low relative to the model. This is not a bad thing, but most photographers tend to position the light a little higher. Not a big deal either way.
     
  10. Derrel

    Derrel Mr. Rain Cloud

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2009
    Messages:
    48,229
    Likes Received:
    18,867
    Location:
    USA
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    "Scrim lighting". A little bit more than a decade ago there was a guy who sold a book online about scrim lighting.Perhaps the most famous practitioner was a guy named Dean Collins. There are some of his educational videos available on YouTube. He designed a series of scrims called Lightform panels
     
  11. Derrel

    Derrel Mr. Rain Cloud

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2009
    Messages:
    48,229
    Likes Received:
    18,867
    Location:
    USA
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    • Like Like x 1
  12. Dmitri

    Dmitri No longer a newbie, moving up!

    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2008
    Messages:
    5,882
    Likes Received:
    40
    Location:
    End of the line
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit


    Oh, nice find! Thank you, I"ll have to check that out.
     

Share This Page