Another IR question

Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by Johnboy2978, Apr 5, 2005.

  1. Johnboy2978

    Johnboy2978 No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    My Pentax IST can't use IR film according to the manual ...." Infrared film cannot be used. This camera uses infrared rays to detect film transport so infrared film may be exposed."

    So I was wondering about an IR filter. Is that type of filter used to enhance the effect when using IR film in combination, or is it used to create the effect for folks like me who can't use IR film?

    Thanks
     
  2. Scurra

    Scurra TPF Noob!

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    I believe that IR filters may be aimed at digital users.. TBH i'm not sure if it will have the same effect on standard film but as I understand it it blocks out all light except IR thus if your film cannot detect IR it won't expose the film at all.
     
  3. Johnboy2978

    Johnboy2978 No longer a newbie, moving up!

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  4. terri

    terri Administrator Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Try two things: get the real IR film of your choice, HIE or whatever.....run a roll just to see what happens. I've not done this with my Pentax MZ-S, but only because I can use an old Pentax ME with my newer lenses for HIE. :thumbup: But from what I've heard the potential fogging may not actually intrude upon the frame, and you may be just fine with this camera. Only one way to know for sure. :)

    Secondly, try a roll of Ilford SFX 200. It's not a *real* infrared film, but used with a #25 red filter it blocks out sufficently to produce a very desirable IR effect. Slip the filter off from image to image for regular B&W or IR - all on the same roll of film. :thumbup: It's pretty cool stuff.
     
  5. Johnboy2978

    Johnboy2978 No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    So WORST case scenario, using IR film with this camera would only expose the film, it wouldn't reduce my camera to an expensive paperweight. Right?
     
  6. Jeff Canes

    Jeff Canes No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    ThatÂ’s right, at the worst the film maybe no good but the camera will be fine.
     
  7. Kent Frost

    Kent Frost TPF Noob!

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    I don't know about the newer Canon Rebel EOS film cameras, but I know that all of them up to the Rebel 2000 can't use IR film for the same reason; there's an infrared indicator mechanism that exposes the film.
     
  8. ksmattfish

    ksmattfish Now 100% DC - not as cool as I once was, but still

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    The film cameras that say they shouldn't be used with IR film use an IR beam inside the camera to count sprocket holes for proper spacing and winding. The examples of fogging that I've seen (from Canon cameras) barely affect the image portion of the negative. Only 1 or 2mm along one of the long edges is fogged. Just a bit of cropping will take care of it. Try it out and show us what you get.

    IR filters block visible portions of the spectrum while allowing IR through. This emphasizes the IR effect. If you use IR film without a filter, the IR effects are reduced because you will also be exposing visible light.

    A commonly used IR filter is a #25. It's red, and blocks some of the visible spectrum. IR filters that block most or all of the visible spectrum are also available.

    You can make a homemade IR filter by having a lab develop an unexposed roll of medium format E6 (slide film). You'll get back a dark strip of film that can be cut into round filters that can be stuck inside a UV filter. A single layer will let some visible light through. A double layer blocks almost all visible light.
     

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