B&W film 100 ISO. Which is the best?

Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by Axel, Aug 27, 2005.

  1. Axel

    Axel TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2004
    Messages:
    254
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    US East Coast
    I am looking at Adorama's site and see that there are two different Fuju Films. One is the Fujifilm Neopan 100 Black & White Film ISO 100 and another one is Fujifilm Neopan 100 Acros Black & White Film ISO 100. The price is quite different, but what is the difference between the films?

    Are there any better films out there (better=price/quality of pictures)?

    Thank you
     
  2. Don Simon

    Don Simon TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jul 4, 2005
    Messages:
    2,484
    Likes Received:
    0
    I think Acros is finer grain. Whether it's "better" than any other film depends on what you want it for. There are loads of b&w films out there that can give you great picture quality; if you tell us what sort of photography you want to do then we can probably recommend something specific.

    For a general-purpose film at a good price, as long as you don't want to do massive enlargements, I'd personally recommend Ilford Pan 100 if you can get it; I'm not so familiar with Kojak and Fuji b&w but others who are can probably recommend a good one.
     
  3. Happy Medium

    Happy Medium TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2005
    Messages:
    44
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    League City, Texas
    My personal favorite B&W film is Kodak Plus-X pan 125.
     
  4. montresor

    montresor TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2005
    Messages:
    289
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Cleveland Hts., Ohio
    Have had good results from Ilford Delta 100, provides good contrast in mediocre-light conditions; Plus-X is nice too, softer and a little less contrasty than the Ilford. T-Max at any speed I've not liked much. Fuji Acros has a good tonal range, but here in Cleveland, where there's often heavy cloud cover, much of that wide range is wasted. Or maybe it's just my lens (Canon 28-80 for EOS) doesn't like the Fuji as much? Come to think of it, I have a 45mm Schneider that doesn't much like Plus-X at all. Lens-film interactions, hmmm....
     
  5. wharrison

    wharrison TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jun 8, 2005
    Messages:
    90
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Northwestern Michigan
  6. DocFrankenstein

    DocFrankenstein Clinically Insane?

    Joined:
    Apr 29, 2004
    Messages:
    1,646
    Likes Received:
    6
    I got the cheapest in canada - agfa

    Works good so far. Film choice doesn't matter much.
     
  7. Smith2688

    Smith2688 TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2005
    Messages:
    231
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    The Island
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    Huhhh?
     
  8. Don Simon

    Don Simon TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jul 4, 2005
    Messages:
    2,484
    Likes Received:
    0
    I second the "Huhhh?". Plenty of films work good in terms of capturing a properly exposed image, but if you want your photos to have a specific look then film choice does matter, as does the method of developing, enlarging and the kind of paper used.
     
  9. KevinR

    KevinR TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2005
    Messages:
    1,204
    Likes Received:
    4
    Location:
    Dearborn, MI
    I would say for me Delta 100 has been the film of choice for 100 speed films.

    What doc probably means is that the variables with B&W film makes just the film choice not that big a decision. The developer is huge and how it is developed is a big part too, as in the amount of agitation, temps, etc.
     
  10. Don Simon

    Don Simon TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jul 4, 2005
    Messages:
    2,484
    Likes Received:
    0
    True, they're all inter-related but the choice of film does matter. I mean, otherwise why choose Delta over a cheaper film?
     
  11. ksmattfish

    ksmattfish Now 100% DC - not as cool as I once was, but still

    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2003
    Messages:
    7,021
    Likes Received:
    34
    Location:
    Lawrence, KS
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    I would agree with DocFrakenstein that film choice between similar BW films (with roughly the same ISO and spectral sensitivity) is not critical. Agfa, Kodak, Ilford, Fuji, etc... are all much more alike than they are different. With some very cheap films I have found an annoyingly curly film base which makes it difficult to handle, but the prints I make from them are fine.

    There are so many variables that go into how a BW photo looks. ZaphodB mentioned developing technique, enlarger type, and paper choice. To these I would also add: the lighting of the scene, lens aspects, filters, metering type/style, exposure, film chemical choices, print chemical choices (or a non chemical printing method), print size, and print contrast. Including film choice we now have 12+ variables, and there are more. A change in any one of these can affect how the photo is going to look, and in many cases the differences will be much more pronounced than just a change in film brand.

    In my opinion, choosing a film, and sticking with it long enough to really learn how it works is much more important than what film you choose. I have found that once I really know a film, I can manipulate it's look to have similar aspects that other folks may attribute to a particular brand.
     
  12. Smith2688

    Smith2688 TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2005
    Messages:
    231
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    The Island
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    Right, I imagine that any of the films listed here would yield better results than Kodak's consumer Black and White film, which requires color C-41 developing. (I don't know much about b&w film, but I imagine that the good ones need special developing.)
     

Share This Page

Search tags for this page

best 100 iso b&w film

,
best 100 iso black and white film
,

best 100 iso film

,

best 100 speed black and white film

,

best b&w film

,
best iso 100 b&w film
,

best iso 100 black and white film

,

best iso 100 film

,
dpse best 100iso
,
sharpest iso 100 black and white film