chemicals for developing photos

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by BlackFire19, Oct 12, 2008.

  1. BlackFire19

    BlackFire19 TPF Noob!

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    I think there are at least 3 different types of chemicals i just cant remember them so can someone give me how much of what i put in to make what chemical so i know how much when i am making them in my dark room?
     
  2. ann

    ann No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    you need to be more specific with these questions about darkroom processes.

    is this for film or prints?

    basically one has a specific developer for film, or paper,
    then stop bath that does exactlly what it says, stops the development
    then a fixer.

    check ilford's website for a pdf that will go into specific details about how to develop either negatives or make prints.

    the ratio's will vary depending on which chemicals are being used
     
  3. tirediron

    tirediron Watch the Birdy! Staff Member Supporting Member

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    ann's correct, you need to know specifically what film/paper you're processing and what look you're going for. Temperature, development time, agitation rate, and a bunch of other factors enter in to the equation. Prints are a little more forgiving (but not much), while the development of film, and especially colour slide film is a very exacting process. An extra 30 seconds in the developer, or 1-2 degrees of temperature can ruin things. Always consult the manufacturers documentation.
     
  4. BlackFire19

    BlackFire19 TPF Noob!

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    I am sorry I refer to both film and prints.
     
  5. ann

    ann No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    there are still different chemicals for film vs paper.

    you can use stop bath for both and fixer for both, but they will be in different ratios.

    what chemcials do you have on hand?
     
  6. Mike_E

    Mike_E No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Drop by the film section and what you can't search out will be answered there. :)
     
  7. ksmattfish

    ksmattfish Now 100% DC - not as cool as I once was, but still

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    The info you desire is clearly written on the labels of the chems. Chems come in powder form, concentrated liquid, and stock liquid (usually needs to be diluted). A few chems come ready to use. The instructions are different from chem to chem and manufacturer to manufacturer.

    For instance Kodak D-76 film developer usually comes in powder form. How much water to add to make a stock solution will depend on the size of the pouch you bought. Some people use the stock solution D-76 straight; many like to dilute it 1:1 with water.

    Basic phenidone developer usually comes in liquid form, and is commonly mixed 1:9 with water.
     
  8. Helen B

    Helen B TPF Noob!

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    Here's my reply to another of your recent questions that, like this one, go over subjects you have already asked about:

    Here are the answers from the last time you asked this question and others: link.

    I realise that there is a lot to learn and that you will have a lot of questions, but instead of repeating questions that you have already asked why not post them as follow-up questions in a thread that you have already started. Then people can see what has already been explained, and try to explain further instead of starting afresh.

    Best,
    Helen
     

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