Colour or not?

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by smellabelle, Mar 14, 2007.

  1. smellabelle

    smellabelle TPF Noob!

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    Can anyone tell me whether you think as a beginner your pictures are likely to be any better or worse if you use colour or black & white film?
     
  2. Groupcaptainbonzo

    Groupcaptainbonzo TPF Noob!

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    Horses for courses.. Mono images rely on shade and texture to succeed, While colour images rely on colour combinations... If you have a good texture but a weak palate in the view you are trying to capture then mono is a good idea.
    If you are using digital, always capture in colour, then if you feel the image is strong enough, you can render it in mono on the computer. If you are just starting out ,and are using film. Mono is a great way to learn about texture and how to blend shades.
     
  3. Torus34

    Torus34 No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    B&W film allows you to actually make your prints yourself by develioping the film and making enlargements. This can also be done in color, but it is a more complex process.

    Each medium [b&w or color] is its own peculiar self. Kind of like the difference between charcoals and pastels in art.

    If you wish to explore the world or b&w, including processing and printing, there's a series of articles on this site at:

    http://www.thephotoforum.com/forum/showthread.php?t=67356

    To answer your question, I really don't think it makes much difference whether you start with b&w or color. The important part is to start. Both mediums can be used to produce great prints.
     

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