Darkroom-ish question

Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by Jess, Feb 13, 2005.

  1. Jess

    Jess TPF Noob!

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    My scanner has a negative slide scanner. I'm googling with all my might right now but am a hoping someone here can help too.

    Unfortunately the only room in my house that I could seal to darkness (& it has ventilation!) has very limited counter space for trays and whatnot.

    Is a dark room necessary in order to simply develop film or will a dark bag suffice? I know my grandfather can give me one of those. I'm hoping to develop my film and then just scan the negatives.

    Thanx :D
     
  2. Hertz van Rental

    Hertz van Rental TPF Noob!

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    Of course you don't need a darkroom to process film.
    All you need is a light-proof tank (Paterson or similar). Once you have your film in that you can process in the kitchen or bathroom.
    You don't even need nun's knickers to get the film in the tank. I have done it succesfully under a duvet with the curtains drawn or at night. Let your eyes get accustomed for a minute and then if you can't see anything then neither can the film. But if you have a bag then you're sorted.
     
  3. Jess

    Jess TPF Noob!

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    I've found a few very sparse resources on the devolpement process. I realize I'll need to get a book... but, how do you get the chemicals in the tank w/out exposing the film?
     
  4. SWFLA1

    SWFLA1 TPF Noob!

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    The tanks are light tight. You place the tank, the film and your can opener in the bag, thread your film on to the spool, place the spool in the tank and screw on the top. Once the top is on the tank you can operate in daylight if you want. Simply mix your chemicals and pour them into the top of the tank. (There's an opening that allows the chemicals in, but not light)
     
  5. ferny

    ferny TPF Noob!

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  6. Unimaxium

    Unimaxium TPF Noob!

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    Most (at least I think most) developing tanks have two lids: a light-tight one inside and a water-tight one outside. The light-tight one is basically a funnel that locks inside the tank and allows you to pour in chemicals without any light getting around it. The chemicals flow through the funnel to the bottom of the tank and then up into the area with the film. The inside of the tank is all black so the light can't get around the corners that the chemicals travel through. It's pretty ingenious if you ask me. The water-tight lid is just a normal lid that goes around over the tank and basically just prevents the chemicals from spilling out while you agitate it. Once you see a tank and learn how to load it, you'll understand fully how it works.
     
  7. Jess

    Jess TPF Noob!

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    Woweee! Thank ALL of you, that's great. I'm so pleased. That certainly sounds like a cool device. I look forward to shopping for one. Boy am I glad I got my boyfriend the scanner w/ the film loader NOW!

    I'm so excited I can hardly sit still.
     
  8. Hertz van Rental

    Hertz van Rental TPF Noob!

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    Just be careful how you agitate the chemicals in the tank. The manufacturers usually recommend the inversion method but I have yet to find a tank that doesn't leak. Chemicals running down your arm or dripping on the floor is not good news. The Kodak 'figure of eight' method works well.
     
  9. aggiezach

    aggiezach Yup...

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    You're first tank will more than likely be a paterson daylight tank (if you're gonna get it from ebay for sure) These tanks have a little spindle that comes up to the lid and allows you to agitate the film reel by turning the spindle back and forth. I used one for a while and it worked pretty well! For my stainless steel tanks, the lids snap on very well and inversion is no problem for me. Haven't had any leaks yet :wink: Lets hope they stay that way :)

    Zach :D
     

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